Presidential Palace

Helsinki, Finland

To the north of Kauppatori Square stands the Presidential Palace, one of C. L. Engel’s grand neo-classical buildings. Originally at the beginning of 19th century, a salt storehouse stood on the site. The entire lot was bought by merchant Johan Henrik Heidenstrauch who built the first palace in 1820. He had to sell it to the senate of Finland in 1837 and the building was moved to the official residence of the Tsar or Russia (Imperial Palace of Finland).

The necessary rebuilding and furnishing work, carried out between 1843 and 1845, was directed by architect Carl Ludvig Engel, the creator of neoclassical Helsinki. The Imperial family of Russia visited in palace several times between 1854-1915.

During the World War I palace functioned as military hospital for Russian Army. In the Finnish Civil War (1918) it was first the headquarters of the Executive Committee of the Helsinki Workers and Soldiers Soviet. With the victory of the Whites, the Reds abandoned the Palace, which was temporarily used by German and White Finnish military staff. After the war it was quickly converted to the presidential palace of independent Finland. Complete repairs were made at speed, with the furnishings and art collections of the Palace being returned from storage in the National Museum and the Ateneum Art Museum, and also being supplemented. Since then, it has been the official residence of the President. The Palace was again refurbished and modernised by Martti Välikangas in 1938.

The Presidential Palace is open for tours, which can be arranged through Helsinki Expert.

Reference: Wikipedia

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Details

Founded: 1816-1845
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org
www.tpk.fi

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Діскорд Хтось (11 months ago)
Thanks Finland for welcomeness! I was wondered how country is beauty
BJE May (14 months ago)
Impressive, in part for a touch of humility.
Felix (18 months ago)
Nice from the outside, but you will most likely not be able to go in there.
T K (22 months ago)
Place of great leadership
jian gu (2 years ago)
President's office is the president's office, nothing very special except the glittering fense and motionless guards. There could be rare open-door occasions when public may queue for a chance to walk in and have a look inside.
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