Presidential Palace

Helsinki, Finland

To the north of Kauppatori Square stands the Presidential Palace, one of C. L. Engel’s grand neo-classical buildings. Originally at the beginning of 19th century, a salt storehouse stood on the site. The entire lot was bought by merchant Johan Henrik Heidenstrauch who built the first palace in 1820. He had to sell it to the senate of Finland in 1837 and the building was moved to the official residence of the Tsar or Russia (Imperial Palace of Finland).

The necessary rebuilding and furnishing work, carried out between 1843 and 1845, was directed by architect Carl Ludvig Engel, the creator of neoclassical Helsinki. The Imperial family of Russia visited in palace several times between 1854-1915.

During the World War I palace functioned as military hospital for Russian Army. In the Finnish Civil War (1918) it was first the headquarters of the Executive Committee of the Helsinki Workers and Soldiers Soviet. With the victory of the Whites, the Reds abandoned the Palace, which was temporarily used by German and White Finnish military staff. After the war it was quickly converted to the presidential palace of independent Finland. Complete repairs were made at speed, with the furnishings and art collections of the Palace being returned from storage in the National Museum and the Ateneum Art Museum, and also being supplemented. Since then, it has been the official residence of the President. The Palace was again refurbished and modernised by Martti Välikangas in 1938.

The Presidential Palace is open for tours, which can be arranged through Helsinki Expert.

Reference: Wikipedia

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Details

Founded: 1816-1845
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Luke Phang (5 months ago)
From a tourist's perspective, the palace can only be admired from afar. You can spot this building when you're walking along the market square promenade. The palace is guarded by the royal guards, and if you're lucky enough, you may be able to spot the low-key shift change.
Martin Riggs (8 months ago)
Participated in the signing of the signing of the Joint Declaration, marking Finland's military integration into NATO: Stronger Together!
Benni Sapala (9 months ago)
I am glad, can standing here
liz shirk (13 months ago)
Only saw it from the outside but was happy to walk by
Nikos Gkekas (2 years ago)
The Presidential Palace is the official residence of the Finnish President. This 19th-century Neoclassical edifice is another one of Engel’s creations and you can see the similarities in its design and structure with the design of his other buildings.
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