Ateneum Art Museum

Helsinki, Finland

Ateneum is the national gallery of Finland presenting the most important art collection in Finland. Ateneum's collections includes several classics from most well-known Finnish artists like Akseli Gallen-Kallela, Helene Schjerfbeck and Albert Edefelt. There is also a fine collection of international art, among its gems the works of Vincent van Gogh and Paul Gauguin.

The museum building itself was designed by Theodor Höijer and completed in 1887. The facade of Ateneum is decorated with statues and reliefs which contain a lot of symbols.

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 1887
Category: Museums in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kartik Singh (2 years ago)
Terrific museum. I learned a lot and enjoyed discovering local artists. It's spread out on 3 floors. Be prepared to walk a lot. I spent 4 hours there.
Grace Crislip (2 years ago)
Public art museum is free for children and museo card holders. Has wonderful art, and the third floor has things that I had never seen before. Will be coming back.
Emily Naylor (2 years ago)
Beautiful building paying homage to some fantastic Finnish artists as well as a few others. Good flow and great works of art.
Vladislav Petkevich (2 years ago)
Great museum, many unknown (to me) artists who have nonetheless created very impressive art. From late romantic Era to late modern art, there's a lot to see.
Abdulraouf Murad (2 years ago)
I loved everything about this museum. It's in a gorgeous building, in a wonderful location, with fantastic facilities, and a really excellent collection, with a focus on Finnish art. Highly recommended.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Externsteine Stones

The Externsteine (Extern stones) is a distinctive sandstone rock formation located in the Teutoburg Forest, near the town of Horn-Bad Meinberg. The formation is a tor consisting of several tall, narrow columns of rock which rise abruptly from the surrounding wooded hills. Archaeological excavations have yielded some Upper Paleolithic stone tools dating to about 10,700 BC from 9,600 BC.

In a popular tradition going back to an idea proposed to Hermann Hamelmann in 1564, the Externsteine are identified as a sacred site of the pagan Saxons, and the location of the Irminsul (sacral pillar-like object in German paganism) idol reportedly destroyed by Charlemagne; there is however no archaeological evidence that would confirm the site's use during the relevant period.

The stones were used as the site of a hermitage in the Middle Ages, and by at least the high medieval period were the site of a Christian chapel. The Externsteine relief is a medieval depiction of the Descent from the Cross. It remains controversial whether the site was already used for Christian worship in the 8th to early 10th centuries.

The Externsteine gained prominence when Völkisch and nationalistic scholars took an interest in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This interest peaked under the Nazi regime, when the Externsteine became a focus of nazi propaganda. Today, they remain a popular tourist destination and also continue to attract Neo-Pagans and Neo-Nazis.