Ateneum Art Museum

Helsinki, Finland

Ateneum is the national gallery of Finland presenting the most important art collection in Finland. Ateneum's collections includes several classics from most well-known Finnish artists like Akseli Gallen-Kallela, Helene Schjerfbeck and Albert Edefelt. There is also a fine collection of international art, among its gems the works of Vincent van Gogh and Paul Gauguin.

The museum building itself was designed by Theodor Höijer and completed in 1887. The facade of Ateneum is decorated with statues and reliefs which contain a lot of symbols.

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Details

Founded: 1887
Category: Museums in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kartik Singh (2 years ago)
Terrific museum. I learned a lot and enjoyed discovering local artists. It's spread out on 3 floors. Be prepared to walk a lot. I spent 4 hours there.
Grace Crislip (2 years ago)
Public art museum is free for children and museo card holders. Has wonderful art, and the third floor has things that I had never seen before. Will be coming back.
Emily Naylor (2 years ago)
Beautiful building paying homage to some fantastic Finnish artists as well as a few others. Good flow and great works of art.
Vladislav Petkevich (2 years ago)
Great museum, many unknown (to me) artists who have nonetheless created very impressive art. From late romantic Era to late modern art, there's a lot to see.
Abdulraouf Murad (2 years ago)
I loved everything about this museum. It's in a gorgeous building, in a wonderful location, with fantastic facilities, and a really excellent collection, with a focus on Finnish art. Highly recommended.
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