Ateneum Art Museum

Helsinki, Finland

Ateneum is the national gallery of Finland presenting the most important art collection in Finland. Ateneum's collections includes several classics from most well-known Finnish artists like Akseli Gallen-Kallela, Helene Schjerfbeck and Albert Edefelt. There is also a fine collection of international art, among its gems the works of Vincent van Gogh and Paul Gauguin.

The museum building itself was designed by Theodor Höijer and completed in 1887. The facade of Ateneum is decorated with statues and reliefs which contain a lot of symbols.

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 1887
Category: Museums in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kartik Singh (2 years ago)
Terrific museum. I learned a lot and enjoyed discovering local artists. It's spread out on 3 floors. Be prepared to walk a lot. I spent 4 hours there.
Grace Crislip (2 years ago)
Public art museum is free for children and museo card holders. Has wonderful art, and the third floor has things that I had never seen before. Will be coming back.
Emily Naylor (2 years ago)
Beautiful building paying homage to some fantastic Finnish artists as well as a few others. Good flow and great works of art.
Vladislav Petkevich (2 years ago)
Great museum, many unknown (to me) artists who have nonetheless created very impressive art. From late romantic Era to late modern art, there's a lot to see.
Abdulraouf Murad (2 years ago)
I loved everything about this museum. It's in a gorgeous building, in a wonderful location, with fantastic facilities, and a really excellent collection, with a focus on Finnish art. Highly recommended.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Montparnasse Cemetery

Montparnasse Cemetery was created from three farms in 1824. Cemeteries had been banned from Paris since the closure, owing to health concerns, of the Cimetière des Innocents in 1786. Several new cemeteries outside the precincts of the capital replaced all the internal Parisian ones in the early 19th century: Montmartre Cemetery in the north, Père Lachaise Cemetery in the east, and Montparnasse Cemetery in the south. At the heart of the city, and today sitting in the shadow of the Eiffel Tower, is Passy Cemetery.

Montparnasse cemetery is the burial place of many of France's intellectual and artistic elite as well as publishers and others who promoted the works of authors and artists. There are also many graves of foreigners who have made France their home, as well as monuments to police and firefighters killed in the line of duty in the city of Paris.

The cemetery is divided by Rue Émile Richard. The small section is usually referred to as the small cemetery (petit cimetière) and the large section as the big cemetery (grand cimetière).

Although Baudelaire is buried in this cemetery (division 6), there is also a cenotaph to him (between division 26 and 27). Because of the many notable people buried there, it is a highly popular tourist attraction.