Helsinki Cathedral

Helsinki, Finland

Helsinki Cathedral is a distinct landmark in the scenery of central Helsinki, with a tall green dome surrounded by four smaller domes. It was built in 1830–1852 in neoclassical style to replace an earlier church from 1727. The cathedral was designed by Carl Ludvig Engel, to form the climax of the whole Senate Square laid out by Engel, surrounded by a number of buildings all designed by him.

Today the cathedral is one of the most popular tourist attractions in Helsinki. Annually more than 350,000 people visit the church, some of them to attend religious events, but most as tourists. The church is in regular use for both worship services and special events such as weddings.

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Details

Founded: 1830-1852
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Avishek Gupta (18 months ago)
A decent church in the center of the city. The church is more beautiful from the outside. One of the most visited places in Helsinki.
Srini Venkat (18 months ago)
The building looks majestic. I went during Christmas and there was a small but pretty Christmas market right in front of the cathedral. It looked amazing.
Shawna Tan (2 years ago)
This is a very majestic looking cathedral and is also a historical building. It overseas the Senate square which comes to live during winter with the Christmas market being held there. The photos below are for the Saint Lucia event which is a pagan event where Saint Lucia (girl with candles on the head) will travel around Finland to give blessings and bring light to the country. This event happens during the darkest winter months. If you're here at the Cathedral, be sure to climb the stairs to get a breath taking view of the Senate square below.
Lance Rhodes (2 years ago)
Lovely building from the outside. Stunning. Don't bother going inside. Very plan very white. The organ is nice.
Navpreet Rocks (2 years ago)
Beautiful and located in Central of Helsinki. When you reach on the top and have a view it looks amazing. You can easily reach here by Trams or by walk. Beautiful church it is. Must visit....
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