Helsinki Cathedral

Helsinki, Finland

Helsinki Cathedral is a distinct landmark in the scenery of central Helsinki, with a tall green dome surrounded by four smaller domes. It was built in 1830–1852 in neoclassical style to replace an earlier church from 1727. The cathedral was designed by Carl Ludvig Engel, to form the climax of the whole Senate Square laid out by Engel, surrounded by a number of buildings all designed by him.

Today the cathedral is one of the most popular tourist attractions in Helsinki. Annually more than 350,000 people visit the church, some of them to attend religious events, but most as tourists. The church is in regular use for both worship services and special events such as weddings.

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Details

Founded: 1830-1852
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Paulo Gustavo (18 months ago)
They call is the wedding cake church! Beautiful inside and out! Enjoy it to the MAX!
Ray (21 months ago)
At one glance it looks like a White House in US. It's extremely plain and simple by European standards though. Even the little church in my neighbourhood has more curves, bells and whistles but it carries the same design philosophy and totally in tune with Finland's general architectural theme. Nothing striking or exceptional but totally practical and functional.
epiplespia (2 years ago)
Lovely church. Probably the most beautiful church in Finland. Definetly is one of the best places to visit as turist! Really beautiful!
Giorgia Pgg (2 years ago)
Very impressive,unfortunately you have to buy a ticket to enter and it's open for just a few hours a day Climbing all the way up the steps is also hard work but worth it! Square beneath is lively and very trimmed with lots of spots to relax or have a snack
Nhat Ngoc Trinh (2 years ago)
A stunning minimalistic church.
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