Uspenski Cathedral

Helsinki, Finland

Uspenski Cathedral is an Eastern Orthodox cathedral dedicated to the Dormition of the Theotokos (the Virgin Mary). The cathedral was designed by the Russian architect Alexey Gornostaev (1808–1862), but it was built after his death in 1862-1868. It was made of bricks brought mainly from Bomarsund fortress in Åland which had been destroyed during the Crimean War in 1854.

Uspenski cathedral represents the Slavonic architecture, but the interior has a strong Byzantine influence. The cathedral has also several valuable icons. With its golden cupolas and redbrick facade, the cathedral is one of the clearest symbols of the Russian impact on Finnish history. It’s very popular tourist attraction with half million annual visits.

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Details

Founded: 1862-1868
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Vagelis Antoniadis (2 years ago)
The red brick used for building it, make it unique and visible from far away.
Michael A. (2 years ago)
Beautiful Cathedral. Wasn't able to go inside, but it looks great on the outside. There's a small park next to it.
jiwi (2 years ago)
Worth a visit if you can and easy to reach by public transport. Try to catch a concert there if you have a chance.
Irene Cotrina (2 years ago)
It's so surprising to see an ornate orthodox church amongst the severe, straight lined, Lutheran ones in Finland! The church is very imposing and, in the winter's days, surrounded by snow and half hidden in the mist, it looks as it came out of a fairy tale book. Worth a visit!
Anthony Stevenson (2 years ago)
A beautiful, imposing cathedral, externally with expansive views across the city and, internally a large open space strikingly illuminated by large windows in the walls and domes. Slightly disappointed that tourists were hemmed into just one side and unable to wander around, however, it was clearly in use by worshippers. Immobile visitors may find the trek uphill challenging.
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