The history of Inju manor (Innis) goes back to at least 1520. In 1894 the current building was erected, probably designed by architect Rudolf von Engelhardt. It is one of the most characteristic examples of neo-Renaissance manor house architecture in Estonia. Starting in 1920, the manor house accommodates a orphanage.

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Travel in Europe said 5 years ago
There would have been a giant, gas-lit Menorah, one huge Christmas tree, and 20 more themed trees which are more than 30 feet tall. You can begin with all the eighteenth century Old Vaasa Museum, and change from there. The park, using a quantity of 8,000,000 tourists each year, is regarded as the suitable area for the complete family.


Address

207 Inju, Vinni, Estonia
See all sites in Vinni

Details

Founded: 1894
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org
www.mois.ee

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