Kernu estate was established in 1637. The current building owes its stately neoclassical appearance to a thorough renovation executed 1810-1813, possibly by the designs of renowned Helsinki architect Carl Ludvig Engel. The front façade is dominated by a richly decorated portico, while the side facing the park displays a 4-column half rotunda, unique in Estonian architecture. A care home has been operating in the building since the 1920s.

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Address

407, Harjumaa, Estonia
See all sites in Harjumaa

Details

Founded: 1810-1813
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org
www.mois.ee

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Aleksandrs Naumovs (4 months ago)
Try the pancakes with salmon. Amazing!!!
Henri Viies (6 months ago)
Beautiful, really well renovated and kept mansion quite close to Tallinn. Great for cultural events like theatre or concerts. Even saw a wedding there once!
Alvar Lumberg (6 months ago)
Nice and well renovated manor house. Good for events with 30-50 people.
Heigo Ausmees (8 months ago)
Great for weddings and parties.
Andrew Millward (2 years ago)
A real treat for those that love the finer things in life. I asked the owner where the exquisite furniture had been acquired " from the queen of England " i was informed. I love the renovation process and Kernu is like many other manor houses in Estonia being lovingly renovated as time progresses. I hope in some ways full renovation is never achieved as evidence of age and history are important aspects of old buildings I believe.
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