Trelleborgen Viking Fortress

Trelleborg, Sweden

Trelleborg is a collective name for six Viking Age circular forts, located in Denmark and the southern part of modern Sweden. Five of them have been dated to the reign of the Harold Bluetooth of Denmark (died 986). The city of Trelleborg has been named after one of these fortresses. Today Trelleborgen is part of a Viking Age fortress complex, which has been reconstructed. There is a Viking musem with souvenir shop, café and guided tours during the summer. Various events for both children and adults are also arranged during the summer to demonstrate how it must have been to live here in the Viking Age.

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Details

Founded: 10th century
Category: Ruins in Sweden
Historical period: Viking Age (Sweden)

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sch Lukas (6 months ago)
good to rest. friendly guard
Fredrik Olsson (6 months ago)
Very interesting and authentic fortress from the Viking era.
Stephen BlauTV (8 months ago)
Even if the (partially) reconstructed Viking fortress is not very large, it gives a good idea of ​​this time together with the museum. Well worth a visit if one is interested in the Viking time or if you are in Trelleborg anyway.
Ana Carv (9 months ago)
The viking fortress and surroundings are interesting (which you have access for free) but you can avoid to pay the 60 sek fee. The museum is one room, with literally only information you could get on the internet, plus one tiny cabin that you go in and out in 2 minutes... Extremely overpriced!
Lena Sundlöf (9 months ago)
Nice with some displays of viking life in this wooden palisade museum.
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