Trelleborgen Viking Fortress

Trelleborg, Sweden

Trelleborg is a collective name for six Viking Age circular forts, located in Denmark and the southern part of modern Sweden. Five of them have been dated to the reign of the Harold Bluetooth of Denmark (died 986). The city of Trelleborg has been named after one of these fortresses. Today Trelleborgen is part of a Viking Age fortress complex, which has been reconstructed. There is a Viking musem with souvenir shop, café and guided tours during the summer. Various events for both children and adults are also arranged during the summer to demonstrate how it must have been to live here in the Viking Age.

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Details

Founded: 10th century
Category: Ruins in Sweden
Historical period: Viking Age (Sweden)

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kristýna Koželská Víchová (8 months ago)
We have seen just the wall, but there is also a museum few blocks away
Jan Henryk Wachala (11 months ago)
In this place you can see how live people in viking age Also do you know blue tooth ?Is information here about this. Please look in picture or visit us.
Philipp Gröne (12 months ago)
Worth a visit! Good place to learn about skandinavian history.
Giorgio Berardi (13 months ago)
A visit to the Trelleborgen is a veritable time travel, and it is a real pity that only part of the outer defensive wall has been dug up and made accessible to the public. In spite of the partial restoration, the structure gives you a clear idea of what fortifications must have looked at the time. Enjoyable.
Mike Whitla (13 months ago)
Interesting fort but only one quarter of the fort has been preserved.
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