Kungshuset, the "King's House", was built by the Danish king Frederick II between 1578–1584 and originally intended as the residence for the bishop of Lund. After the secession of the Scanian lands to Sweden at the Treaty of Roskilde 1658, and the foundation of Lund University in 1666 to enhance the Swedification of the Danish provinces, the house was incorporated to serve as the university's main building and library. For a time the top of the tower also held an observatory.

An often related local legend has it that king Charles XII of Sweden, who resided in Lund for a time between campaigns in the 1710s, rode up the wide wooden stairs in the tower. The legend is easily debunked, as the tower was added to the building only later in the 18th century.

The house held the University Library in the mid-19th century, but was in a bad shape, with a leaking roof for instance. The professor of Greek language at the time, Carl Georg Brunius, whose prolific work as an amateur architect is seen in many characteristic Lund buildings, took it as upon himself to improve the condition of the building. Today, Kungshuset houses the Department of Philosophy.

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Address

Kyrkogatan 6, Lund, Sweden
See all sites in Lund

Details

Founded: 1578-1584
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Sweden
Historical period: Early Vasa Era (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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ALI B (11 months ago)
Nice house
Ali Moallemi (16 months ago)
King's Manson and Castle
Johan Linse (18 months ago)
Fine
Hardy Törnqvist (4 years ago)
Maxime LMA (4 years ago)
Bien
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