Lund Cathedral

Lund, Sweden

Lund Cathedral was consecrated in 1145, and contains many well-known artefacts and features of considerable historical interest. Since then service has been held here every day for almost 900 years. Today over 700 000 persons visit the church each year with some 85 000 who attends a service.

The first cathedral was built in Lund before 1085, but it is difficult to know if the present building was built in the same place. The Cathedral School was established in 1085, making it Denmark's oldest school. The building of the present Cathedral began in 1080s. Its first Archbishop, Ascer, consecrated the high altar in the Crypt in 1123; and his successor, Archbishop Eskil, then consecrated the main cathedral building in 1145.

During the 16th century the Cathedral was restored by the West-phalian stone mason, Adam van Düren, and his sculptured figures can be seen in several parts of the building. In the 19th century the Cathedral was again thoroughly renovated, first by C.G. Brunius, and then by Helgo Zettervall. Further restoration work was undertaken in the period 1954-63 by Eiler Graebe.

Among the Cathedral’s many attractions, there is the magnificent horological artistic masterpiece, Horologium mirabili Lundense, dating from 1424. This early time and dating machine is still in working order with it rotating mechanical figures marking the passage of time. The Crypt is yet guarded by the figure of Giant Finn. There are also three rare bronze pillars with mounted statues from around 1240. The finely carved oak choir stalls are from the middle of the 14th century; and the majestic altar dates from 1398. On the other hand, the fine Absidens mosaic by Joakim Skovgaard, is from the 1920´s.

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Address

Kyrkogatan 6, Lund, Sweden
See all sites in Lund

Details

Founded: 1080-1145
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Olga Koter (2 years ago)
Worth seeing especially for the huge calendar (on the left side of the entrance).
Rositsa Nikolova (3 years ago)
Beautiful place with nice acoustic! We attend a choir concert and it was magical
Steffy MJ (3 years ago)
Such a beautiful, beautiful place. Haven't seen such a magnificent building in a very long time.
Iulian Turicianu (3 years ago)
This was one of my favorite churches to visit, ever! It has a very eerie feeling of more than a Christian church, I felt a lot of symbols from before Christianity give it a more old temple like feeling, with weird statues and gargoyles. It was definitely an experience.
Michael Bossetta (3 years ago)
The most beautiful landmark in Lund, and perhaps all of Sweden! This iconic church was built in 1080 AD, back when Lund was the religious capital of the Danish empire. It’s amazing to think something so HUGE was built that long ago. You can just walk in most days, and the church provides a lovely ambience to walk around and explore the crypt and even an astrological clock!
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