St. Peter's Church

Malmö, Sweden

St. Peter’s Church is the oldest building in Malmö. The construction was started in the early 1300s. It has influenced by the St. Mary’s Church in Lübeck. The tower and several chapels were added during the 15th century.

The pulpit is made of stone in the 16th century, the font date back to 1601. Although most of the mural paintings has been destroyed during the centuries, there is one very richly decorated chapel remaining of painting work made of unknown "Malmö master" around 1520.

References:
  • Marianne Mehling et al. Knaurs Kulturführer in Farbe. Schweden. München 1987.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Nibras Hassan (11 months ago)
Quiet nad inspired space ❤️
Idris (11 months ago)
I didn't take any pictures here because I felt I needed to pay attention to the details within this church and respect. The architecture is quite unique from other churches I've been to. A must see if you're in Malmo
János Kiss (15 months ago)
Unfortunately the church is close for public because of renovation. As we understand it is open for the visitors for a short time (1-2 hours/day). There is a tent behind the church. Under the tent there are ceremonies for pray.
Sayel Cortes (15 months ago)
Closed for renovation until December 2018. Still quite beautiful outside and religious services are conducted in a temporary location next to the church
James Ryan (16 months ago)
A lot of interesting artwork and architecture although is a little hard to know what you're looking at without prior research or being able to speak Swedish.
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