Lund Historical Museum

Lund, Sweden

The Historical museum in Lund, founded in 1805, is the second largest archaeological museum in Sweden. Its collections contain among other things Kilian Stobaeus' Cabinet of Curiosities from the 18th century, thousands of finds from the excavations of the Iron Age city of Uppåkra and numerous artefacts from the Scanian Stone, Bronze and Iron Ages. The museum also has the second largest coin collection in the country, a large department of medieval church art and artefacts from Classical Antiquity.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Address

Kraftstorg 1, Lund, Sweden
See all sites in Lund

Details

Founded: 1805
Category: Museums in Sweden
Historical period: The Age of Enlightenment (Sweden)

More Information

www.luhm.lu.se

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Simone Loewe (2 years ago)
Nice Museum.
Day Time (2 years ago)
The museum is now renovated and even though it looks very nice one can’t avoid missing some old pieces which have been replaced. It is spacious, homely & clean like all other Swedish historical museums. The history in this place is rich & portrays “Nordic” history. The place is full of tourists & entrance is free for students with identification. Adult’s rates are relatively cheap. Educative place!
Joseph Noussair (3 years ago)
A nice small museum with an academic collection which a non-scholar can still take interest in.
Peter Vang Christensen (3 years ago)
A nice little museum. Bonus for showing arrows that my grandfather found in a bog in the northern part of Scania.
Simius Taaravara (4 years ago)
Great museum with lots of historical (and pre-historical) artifacts. Great for kids, especially on Sundays when the museum arranges things for the kids! Its placed in one of the more beautiful parts of Lund, close to the big church and some of the older university buildings.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Medvedgrad

Medvedgrad is a medieval fortified town located on the south slopes of Medvednica mountain, approximately halfway from the Croatian capital Zagreb to the mountain top Sljeme. For defensive purposes it was built on a hill, Mali Plazur, that is a spur of the main ridge of the mountain that overlooks the city. On a clear day the castle can be seen from far away, especially the high main tower. Below the main tower of the castle is Oltar Domovine (Altar of the homeland) which is dedicated to Croatian soldiers killed in the Croatian War of Independence.

In 1242, Mongols invaded Zagreb. The city was destroyed and burned to the ground. This prompted the building of Medvedgrad. Encouraged by Pope Innocent IV, Philip Türje, bishop of Zagreb, built the fortress between 1249 and 1254. It was later owned by bans of Slavonia. Notable Croatian and Hungarian poet and ban of Slavonia Janus Pannonius (Ivan Česmički) died in the Medvedgrad castle on March 27, 1472.

The last Medvedgrad owners and inhabitants was the Gregorijanec family, who gained possession of Medvedgrad in 1562. In 1574, the walls of Medvedgrad were reinforced, but after the 1590 Neulengbach earthquake, the fortress was heavily damaged and ultimately abandoned. It remained in ruins until the late 20th century, when it was partly restored and now offers a panoramic view of the city from an altitude of over 500 meters.