Lund Historical Museum

Lund, Sweden

The Historical museum in Lund, founded in 1805, is the second largest archaeological museum in Sweden. Its collections contain among other things Kilian Stobaeus' Cabinet of Curiosities from the 18th century, thousands of finds from the excavations of the Iron Age city of Uppåkra and numerous artefacts from the Scanian Stone, Bronze and Iron Ages. The museum also has the second largest coin collection in the country, a large department of medieval church art and artefacts from Classical Antiquity.

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Address

Kraftstorg 1, Lund, Sweden
See all sites in Lund

Details

Founded: 1805
Category: Museums in Sweden
Historical period: The Age of Enlightenment (Sweden)

More Information

www.luhm.lu.se

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Simone Loewe (2 years ago)
Nice Museum.
Day Time (2 years ago)
The museum is now renovated and even though it looks very nice one can’t avoid missing some old pieces which have been replaced. It is spacious, homely & clean like all other Swedish historical museums. The history in this place is rich & portrays “Nordic” history. The place is full of tourists & entrance is free for students with identification. Adult’s rates are relatively cheap. Educative place!
Joseph Noussair (3 years ago)
A nice small museum with an academic collection which a non-scholar can still take interest in.
Peter Vang Christensen (3 years ago)
A nice little museum. Bonus for showing arrows that my grandfather found in a bog in the northern part of Scania.
Simius Taaravara (4 years ago)
Great museum with lots of historical (and pre-historical) artifacts. Great for kids, especially on Sundays when the museum arranges things for the kids! Its placed in one of the more beautiful parts of Lund, close to the big church and some of the older university buildings.
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