Malmö Castle

Malmö, Sweden

Malmö Castle (Malmöhus) was founded in 1434 by King Eric of Pomerania. This structure was demolished in early 16th century. The castle acquired its present appearance following major reconstruction in the 1530’s, when King Christian III ordered the building of a modern fortress, splendid Renaissance castle and county governor´s residence, all on the one site. Historically, this fortress was one of the most important strongholds of Denmark.

Denmark´s coins were minted there in the Middle Ages. Crown Prince Frederick held wild parties in the 16th century. Prisoners were beheaded in the courtyard in the 19th century. Malmöhus has now been restored in the spirit of the 16th century and is part of the Malmö Museums, the largest museum in southern Sweden. The castle is part of Sweden´s cultural heritage and is managed by the National Property Board.

The castle was for five years (1568-1573) the prison of James Hepburn, 4th Earl of Bothwell, third husband of Mary, Queen of Scots. The earl was taken into custody on the orders of the Protestant Danish king Frederick II of Denmark when his ship ran aground in Bergen, Norway during a storm. He was sent to Malmö Castle to be imprisoned, although he had previously been released from Tower of London for lack of evidence in the murder of Mary's second husband, Henry Stuart, Lord Darnley. As a bachelor, Frederick II courted Elizabeth I of England and was made a Knight of the Garter. Some sources suggest a second reason for the involvement in this matter by the Danish king; he is thought to have held hopes of collecting a ransom from Scotland. However, the Earl of Bothwell died in 1578 in Dragsholm Castle, Zealand, where he had been moved after the first five years in Danish captivity, without ever being the subject of Danish-Scottish negotiations for his release.

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Details

Founded: 1434
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: Kalmar Union (Sweden)

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Bren Verde (21 months ago)
Very nice museum and also very cheap. Inside there are 3 museums and u can visit also the museum across the street in the same price . Around 5€ entrance fee for adult.
Dhaval Patel (21 months ago)
it was wonderful museum, go up stairs and spend much time over there, if u r history lover. very good information and aquarium on ground floor, do not forget to visit wind mill behind the building. you can spend almost 3-4 hours easily in museum and you will not realize at all...!
Steffon Cumberbatch (2 years ago)
Malmö Castle is beautiful inside and out. I recommend taking a nice stroll around the perimeter of the castle and taking in the beauty of the grass and water features against the castle itself. Inside the castle there is no shortage of interesting historical information, beautiful artwork, and ornate decor. It was definitely worth stopping by while we were in town.
Kendra Lamont (2 years ago)
Very cool museum. Kind of a weird layout so lots of walking and backtracking to see it all. A little spooky with the human skeleton and the weird music.
Marcus Forelius (2 years ago)
Pretty cool castle museum with an interestingly wide variety of exhibits. The history portion is top notch but a little twisty-turns in its layout. For me that just added to its charm. There was a portion on the military and royal history of the fortress and an aquarium, which is certainly an interesting mix. I especially liked the 20-40’s fashion and the exhibit on Capa’s photos from the Spanish Civil War, a random and awesome find. If you are in Copenhagen for a couple of days come to Malmö and come to this museum.
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