Stjerneborg Observatory

Sankt Ibb, Sweden

Stjerneborg (Star Castle) was Tycho Brahe's underground observatory next to his palace-observatory Uraniborg, located on the island of Hven in Oresund. Tycho Brahe built it circa 1581. He writes: "My purpose was partly to have placed some of the most important instruments securely and firmly in order that they should not be exposed to the disturbing influence of the wind, and should be easier to use, partly to separate my collaborators when there were several with me at the same time, and have some of them make observations in the castle itself, others in these cellars, in order that they should not get in the way of each other or compare their observations before I wanted this." He named it Stiernburg in vernacular or Stellæburgusin Latin.

The underground portions of the observatory were excavated in the 1950s and are today fitted with a roof approximating the original one. The chambers now house a multimedia show open to the public.

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Details

Founded: ca. 1581
Category:
Historical period: Early Vasa Era (Sweden)

Rating

3.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Charlie Jacoby (2 years ago)
ALostHappyPanda (2 years ago)
Tommy Sjölander (2 years ago)
På Stjerneborg på Ven känner man Tycho Brahes närhet och historiens vingslag. Museet i före detta kyrkan är bra. Föreställningen i de rekonstruerade resterna av observatoriet, si så där.
Itsme, Molly (2 years ago)
Intressant för de som tycker om Copernikus men själv tuckte jag int det var så roligt.
Bjarne Noréus (3 years ago)
Intressant föreställning
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