Fagervik ironworks, one of the oldest in Finland, was founded in 1646. The ironworks consisted of two iron forges and one blast furnace. The remarkable rococo-style manor was built in 1773 by Johan Hisinger. It’s located near the "King’s Way", a road from Turku to Vyborg. Both Gustav III (the king of Sweden) and Alexander I (the tzar of Russia) have stood overnight in Fagervik. The large baroque-style park with the Chinese pavilion surrounds the manor. It was built by Mikael Hisinger in the end of the 18th century.

There’s also a privately owned church built in 1737 and several small labour’s houses near the ironworks. Fagervik is well-preserved and solid sample of the early industrial architecture in Finland. The Fagervik-Snappertuna area is defined as National Landscape Heritage.

The ironworks, manor and museum with café is open to the public in summertime. Also guided walking tours are available for visitors.

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Founded: 1646
Category: Industrial sites in Finland
Historical period: Swedish Empire (Finland)

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