Björnstorp Castle

Genarp, Sweden

Björnstorp Castle was built in 1752 and reshaped in 1860-1880, with its final appearance set in 1868, by architect Helgo Zettervall. The original builder was Christina Törnflyckt who was married to famous stateman Carl Piper. The castle represents romantic Rococo style.

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Address

790, Genarp, Sweden
See all sites in Genarp

Details

Founded: 1752
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: The Age of Liberty (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

John Doe (4 months ago)
Var på julmarknad. Okej att gå runt mellan logarna.
Anders Jacobsson (5 months ago)
Fin plats för Julmarknad och honung från Anders Bigårdar
Johan Hjelm (5 months ago)
Mycket vacker miljö som andas stillhet och energi.Julmarknaden va 5 stjärnor.
agneta wall (5 months ago)
Fanns allt som ska finnas på en julmarknad. Inget krimskrams. Genuint konsthantverk. Fina produkter att stoppa i munnen. Välorganiserad parkering. Första gången för oss. Kommer bara att bli den from nästa år! Man har ju varit på en del genom åren. Lunna melle var en extra stjärna ⭐
Noura Hadid (5 months ago)
Der var et super hyggeligt julemarked med masser af små boder med salg af lækre julegaver, smykker, pynteting, ost, marmalader m.m. For de små så kunne de ride og se islandske heste i en lille tur, samt se på får.
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