Drotten Church Ruins

Lund, Sweden

Drotten Church was built around 1050 and it was the second largest church in Lund. The building was about 50m long and probably made for bishop’s church. Archaeologists have also found evidences of even earlier stave church on the site, built probably in the 990 by Danish King Svend Tveskæg.

Drotten Church was rebuilt several times and since 1150 it functioned as a parish church and later an abbey church. The church was demolished during the Reformation in 1500s. The excavations in 1980s revealed the well-preserved remains of the church and abbey. Today there is a museum.

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Address

Kattesund 6, Lund, Sweden
See all sites in Lund

Details

Founded: ca. 1050
Category: Ruins in Sweden
Historical period: Viking Age (Sweden)

More Information

www.kulturportallund.se

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Iulian Turicianu (2 years ago)
It was a bit difficult to find but it was totally worth it. Very interesting history!
Arun GN (3 years ago)
Good place to visit
James Nye (3 years ago)
I was so very glad to stumble upon this amazing site.
David Villa (3 years ago)
Spännande "museum" med Drottens kyrkoruin. Kul att man tagit vara på ruinen, synd bara att men inte gjort något bättre museum av det. Lite innehållsfattigt och anonymt. Men sen kostar det ingenting att gå dit så...
Sevärdheter Skåne (3 years ago)
Drottens kyrkoruin är en medeltida kyrkoruin i centrala Lund som sedermera blivit ett museum.Drottens kyrka byggdes förmodligen under 1050-talet och revs i samband med reformationen. Över kyrkans gamla plats utlades gatan Kattesund.I samband med utgrävningar på Kattesund under 1970- och 80-talet återfanns kyrkoruinen. Även en äldre stavkyrka hittades på samma plats. Vid utgrävningarna hittades även spår efter en äldre stavkyrka i trä. Den tros ha uppförts av den danske kungen Svend Tveskæg omkring år 990. Detta gör stavkyrkan till Lunds och Skånes äldsta kyrka.Det beslutades att stenarna skulle få ligga kvar och göras om till ett underjordiskt museum och att ett hus skulle byggas ovanpå.Museet kunde invigas den 11 september 1987.
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