Svenstorp Castle

Lund, Sweden

Svenstorp Castle was built in 1596 by Beata Hvitfeldt, a powerful lady-in-waiting to the Danish King Christian IV. Her architect was Hans Steenwinkel. In November 1676, the Danish king, Christian V, stayed at Svenstorp before the Battle of Lund. The night after the battle the Swedish king, Charles XI, whose troops had won the battle, stayed in the same room and the same bed. Since 1723, the castle has been owned by the Gyllenkrok family. Today, Nils and Merrill Gyllenkrok and their family live at Svenstorp Castle.

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Address

940, Lund, Sweden
See all sites in Lund

Details

Founded: 1596
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: Early Vasa Era (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mikaela Sjunnesson (5 months ago)
Jättefint, mysigt och värt att besöka!
Mohsin Mohmmed (6 months ago)
Nice place to visit
Cecilia Stockmab (7 months ago)
Vacker natur och slotts miljö planerar besöks cs
Stefan Wode (8 months ago)
A very nice castle and very nice people
Jonny och Ann-Christine Andersson (2 years ago)
Ett slott med spännande historia eftersom det var där som den danske kungen Christian V bodde tiden före Slaget vid Lund 1676 och den svenske kungen Carl XI andra natten efter slaget, och båda i samma säng i samma rum, det s.k. kungsrummet. Med den här historien så hade det varit roligt om slottets nuvarande ägare kunde erbjuda turister och besökare möjlighet att få komma in och se på just kungsrummet mot en entréavgift under sommartid. Vi planerar att cykla runt till de olika platserna för Slaget vid Lund till sommaren och då hade det varit roligt att få göra ett besök i rummet. Men vi förstår förstås att det kanske inte skulle vara praktiskt möjligt att kunna erbjuda den möjligheten.
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