Svenstorp Castle

Lund, Sweden

Svenstorp Castle was built in 1596 by Beata Hvitfeldt, a powerful lady-in-waiting to the Danish King Christian IV. Her architect was Hans Steenwinkel. In November 1676, the Danish king, Christian V, stayed at Svenstorp before the Battle of Lund. The night after the battle the Swedish king, Charles XI, whose troops had won the battle, stayed in the same room and the same bed. Since 1723, the castle has been owned by the Gyllenkrok family. Today, Nils and Merrill Gyllenkrok and their family live at Svenstorp Castle.

References:

Comments

Your name



Address

940, Lund, Sweden
See all sites in Lund

Details

Founded: 1596
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: Early Vasa Era (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mikaela Sjunnesson (3 years ago)
Jättefint, mysigt och värt att besöka!
Mohsin Mohmmed (3 years ago)
Nice place to visit
Cecilia Stockmab (3 years ago)
Vacker natur och slotts miljö planerar besöks cs
Stefan Wode (3 years ago)
A very nice castle and very nice people
Jonny och Ann-Christine Andersson (4 years ago)
Ett slott med spännande historia eftersom det var där som den danske kungen Christian V bodde tiden före Slaget vid Lund 1676 och den svenske kungen Carl XI andra natten efter slaget, och båda i samma säng i samma rum, det s.k. kungsrummet. Med den här historien så hade det varit roligt om slottets nuvarande ägare kunde erbjuda turister och besökare möjlighet att få komma in och se på just kungsrummet mot en entréavgift under sommartid. Vi planerar att cykla runt till de olika platserna för Slaget vid Lund till sommaren och då hade det varit roligt att få göra ett besök i rummet. Men vi förstår förstås att det kanske inte skulle vara praktiskt möjligt att kunna erbjuda den möjligheten.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Bamberg Historic City Centre

Bamberg is located in Upper Franconia on the river Regnitz close to its confluence with the river Main. Its historic city center is a listed UNESCO world heritage site.

Bamberg is a good example of a central European town with a basically early medieval plan and many surviving ecclesiastical and secular buildings of the medieval period. When Henry II, Duke of Bavaria, became King of Germany in 1007 he made Bamberg the seat of a bishopric, intended to become a 'second Rome'. Of particular interest is the way in which the present town illustrates the link between agriculture (market gardens and vineyards) and the urban distribution centre.

From the 10th century onwards, Bamberg became an important link with the Slav peoples, especially those of Poland and Pomerania. During its period of greatest prosperity, from the 12th century onwards, the architecture of this town strongly influenced northern Germany and Hungary. In the late 18th century Bamberg was the centre of the Enlightenment in southern Germany, with eminent philosophers and writers such as Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel and E.T.A. Hoffmann living there.

Bamberg extends over seven hills, each crowned by a beautiful church. This has led to Bamberg being called the 'Franconian Rome'.