Tomarps Kungsgård Castle

Kvidinge, Sweden

Tomarps Kungsgård Castle was probably erected as a Renaissance building in the mid-16th century. It was composed of four, two story high wings with brick roof surrounded by a narrow square yard. The middle part of the northwing consists of the remains of a building from the Middle Ages. I the south-east corner of the yard there were a tower until the late 18th century. The castle belonged to the Brosterups linage in the late 15th century and were then transferred to the Gjedde family. When Borgholm was handed over from Sweden to Denmark after Treaty of Copenhagen in 1660 the Castle was, together with 17 other acreages, handed over to the Swedish king as compensation. It was then used for housing the lieutenant colonel and later the colonel. Today it is used for vernissage.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: mid-1500s
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: Early Vasa Era (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lise Forsberg (2 months ago)
En rigtig fin oplevelse på Tomarps Kungsgård i dag.. smuk gammel borg bygning med tykke mure og spændende rum med gamle prorcelæns kaminer. Alt emmer af historie fra en svunden tid. Her er p.t. en fin udstilling af en del af Nils Forsbergs malerier. Dejlig kaffe og hjemmelavet ostekage.
Tord Lundh (3 months ago)
Historiskt intressant och dessutom med konst utställningar o konserter!
Nikolai Pihlstrom (4 months ago)
Very pretty
Heidi Jalamo (5 months ago)
Alltid värd ett besök. För själva platsens atmosfär. För intressanta ofta spännande utställningar. För det trivsamma bemötandet. För gulaschsoppan! Allt.
Björn Olsson (7 months ago)
Karl Mårtens akvareller. Fantastiska. Miljön, slottet, småmysigt, där det fanns små överraskningar i varje rum. BESÖK!. Lite intressant med Kvidinge monumentet över den från hästen fallna kronprinsen Karl August. Han dog och i och med detta så måste en ny arvinge letas upp. Det blev Bernadotte. Så platsen har en stor betydelse för vår kungahistoria.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Lübeck Cathedral

Lübeck Cathedral is a large brick-built Lutheran cathedral in Lübeck, Germany and part of the Lübeck UNESCO World Heritage Site. In 1173 Henry the Lion founded the cathedral to serve the Diocese of Lübeck, after the transfer in 1160 of the bishop's seat from Oldenburg in Holstein under bishop Gerold. The then Romanesque cathedral was completed around 1230, but between 1266 and 1335 it was converted into a Gothic-style building with side-aisles raised to the same height as the main aisle.

On the night of Palm Sunday (28–29 March) 1942 a Royal Air Force bombing raid destroyed a fifth of the town centre. Several bombs fell in the area around the church, causing the eastern vault of the quire to collapse and destroying the altar which dated from 1696. A fire from the neighbouring cathedral museum spread to the truss of the cathedral, and around noon on Palm Sunday the towers collapsed. An Arp Schnitger organ was lost in the flames. Nevertheless, a relatively large portion of the internal fittings was saved, including the cross and almost all of the medieval polyptychs. In 1946 a further collapse, of the gable of the north transept, destroyed the vestibule almost completely.

Reconstruction of the cathedral took several decades, as greater priority was given to the rebuilding of the Marienkirche. Work was completed only in 1982.

The cathedral is unique in that at 105 m, it is shorter than the tallest church in the city. This is the consequence of a power struggle between the church and the guilds.

The 17 m crucifix is the work of the Lübeck artist Bernt Notke. It was commissioned by the bishop of Lübeck, Albert II. Krummendiek, and erected in 1477. The carvings which decorate the rood screen are also by Notke.

Since the war, the famous altar of Hans Memling has been in the medieval collection of the St. Annen Museum, but notable polyptychs remain in the cathedral.

In the funeral chapels of the southern aisle are Baroque-era memorials by the Flemish sculptor Thomas Quellinus.