Tomarps Kungsgård Castle

Kvidinge, Sweden

Tomarps Kungsgård Castle was probably erected as a Renaissance building in the mid-16th century. It was composed of four, two story high wings with brick roof surrounded by a narrow square yard. The middle part of the northwing consists of the remains of a building from the Middle Ages. I the south-east corner of the yard there were a tower until the late 18th century. The castle belonged to the Brosterups linage in the late 15th century and were then transferred to the Gjedde family. When Borgholm was handed over from Sweden to Denmark after Treaty of Copenhagen in 1660 the Castle was, together with 17 other acreages, handed over to the Swedish king as compensation. It was then used for housing the lieutenant colonel and later the colonel. Today it is used for vernissage.

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Details

Founded: mid-1500s
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: Early Vasa Era (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lise Forsberg (4 years ago)
En rigtig fin oplevelse på Tomarps Kungsgård i dag.. smuk gammel borg bygning med tykke mure og spændende rum med gamle prorcelæns kaminer. Alt emmer af historie fra en svunden tid. Her er p.t. en fin udstilling af en del af Nils Forsbergs malerier. Dejlig kaffe og hjemmelavet ostekage.
Tord Lundh (4 years ago)
Historiskt intressant och dessutom med konst utställningar o konserter!
Nikolai Pihlstrom (4 years ago)
Very pretty
Heidi Jalamo (4 years ago)
Alltid värd ett besök. För själva platsens atmosfär. För intressanta ofta spännande utställningar. För det trivsamma bemötandet. För gulaschsoppan! Allt.
Björn Olsson (4 years ago)
Karl Mårtens akvareller. Fantastiska. Miljön, slottet, småmysigt, där det fanns små överraskningar i varje rum. BESÖK!. Lite intressant med Kvidinge monumentet över den från hästen fallna kronprinsen Karl August. Han dog och i och med detta så måste en ny arvinge letas upp. Det blev Bernadotte. Så platsen har en stor betydelse för vår kungahistoria.
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