Ethnographic Museum

Gdańsk, Poland

Located inside the 18th-century Abbatial Granary inside Oliwa Park, this delightful little diversion features three floors showcasing all manner of folk-related artifacts from Eastern Pomerania and is considered to be one of the best collections of its kind in Poland. Exhibits include a wide range of folk art from wood carvings to some really amazing paintings made between the 18th and the early 20th century as well as folk furniture, displays of traditional fishing implements and other oddities. Explanations are in Polish only and there are no guide books for sale, but the museum is such a treat that you hardly notice this at all.

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Address

Cystersów 19, Gdańsk, Poland
See all sites in Gdańsk

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Category: Museums in Poland

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kuba (8 months ago)
Obsługa niemiła, ekspozycja mała i słabo przedstawiona.
Andrzej Wojciechowski (10 months ago)
Ciekawa wystawa i fajne miejsce do spędzenia czasu z dziećmi ;-)
Piotr Stonewest (11 months ago)
Muzeum ma siedzibę w parku w cysterskim spichlerzu. Klimatyczne wnętrze. Wiele artefaktów do połowu ryb (z Kaszub). Na poddaszu sala interaktywna dla dzieci.
Ania P. (15 months ago)
Bardzo ciekawe wystawy,polecam iść póki jest wystawa lalek japońskich - do 3 czerwca
Michał Kłosowski (2 years ago)
Free visits on Friday!
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