Pier in Sopot

Sopot, Poland

The Sopot Pier, built as a pleasure pier and as a mooring point for cruise boats, first opened in 1827. The next reconstruction extended the length of 150 metres, then to 315 m. The pier was brought to the contemporary length in 1928, along with the walking passage of the spa. The first non-wooden elements appeared after 1990, when the head was modernised using steel elements.

At 511.5m, the pier is the longest wooden pier in Europe. It stretches into the sea from the middle of Sopot beach which is a popular venue for recreation and health walks (the concentration of iodine at the tip of the pier is twice as high as on land) or public entertainment events, and it also serves as a mooring point for cruise boats and water taxis. It is also an excellent point for observing the World Sailing Championship, the Baltic Windsurfing Cup and the Sopot Triathlon taking place on the bay. Sopot pier consists of 2 parts: the famous wooden walking jetty and the Spa Square on land, where concerts and festivities are organised.

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    Founded: 1827
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    Rating

    4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

    User Reviews

    Michal Steier (9 months ago)
    Koszą za wejście na coś, co nie jest szczególnie interesującą atrakcją, kawałek dalej jest przyjemniejsze, bo mniej zatłoczone molo za darmo. Zrobiono z tego znana atrakcję do wyciągania kasy. Obsługa bardzo nieprzyjemna. Na molo i wokoło jest brudno. Słabo.
    Marta Kaminska (9 months ago)
    Nice wooden pier that provides you fantastic view of the Baltic sea and Sopot city. I have visited it during winter season. It was quite windy and cold.
    Divesh Mishra (11 months ago)
    Good place to walk. It was very windy n cold in November last week. There are few good sea side place to sit n enjoy tje view with food or coffee.
    Brett Gottfried (11 months ago)
    This is a very well maintained and beautiful tier in Sopot. There are some restaurants on the edge and a couple at the end if you get hungry on your journey out to the ocean. This is actually the largest wooden pier in Europe. Definitely a great place to visit
    Yellow Zapdos - Food & Travel (11 months ago)
    I must be my lucky day. It's free to walk the pier until April 26, 2019 and it's a nice stroll! If you enjoy my reviews, please check out my YouTube food channel!
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