The Naval Museum of Gdynia is focused on the history of the Polish navy history. The museum contains a huge collection (20.000 pieces) of weapons used by the Polish navy. Show-piece is currently the ORP Blyskawica, a Polish destroyer used in the Second World War.

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Category: Museums in Poland

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Nadine G (3 months ago)
Nicely presented contemporary marine history.
Andrey Moiseev (5 months ago)
Small but quite interesting exhibition. It worth to buy one ticket for both museum and war ship. On the roof there is beautiful restaurant with very nice view to the beach and Marina.
Wesley Stokkers (6 months ago)
Nice museum, not very kindfull employees. They dont speak English
Sebastian PRUS (6 months ago)
Rather small however quite interesting to see display and information provided. Externally display is nice although poorly maintained. Been,seen, happy.
Michal Jurzysta (8 months ago)
Great selection of arms and sea/land artillery on display. All areas of the museum cover a lot of history, well translated and explained. When you buy a ticket it allows you to enter the Blyskawica ship which has a lot of history about the Polish navy. Worth a visit even for regulars, not only military buffs. I thoroughly enjoyed it.
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