Waldau Castle Ruins

Nizov'e, Russia

The earliest official mention of building a fortress in Waldau comes from a chronicle dating to 1258. The name of the castle derives from the Baltic Prussian language, where it meant 'to own'. And in fact, the surrounding lands belonged to two Prussian landowners: Brulant and Diabel, who were called 'tenants' or 'dukes'. In 1264, the dukes were obliged by the Teutonic Knights to set up an inn, in which Teutonic knights, clergymen and soldiers would stay. There, travelling merchants would spend time discussing the ups and downs of commerce over a pint of barley beer or a bottle of cider.

When the lands of Nadrovia and Sudovia had been occupied by the tribe of Yotvingians, the border between the Monastic State of the Teutonic Order and Lithuania moved eastwards. As a result, the fortress of Waldau ceased to serve a defensive role. In 1457 the old building was converted into a residential castle, which from then on served as a summer residence of the Grand Master of the Teutonic Order. When the Order was secularized in 1525, the castle turned into a seat for the administrative authorities in the district of Waldau. In 1858 an agricultural school was established in the castle. Afterwards the castle was completely redesigned and changed into a popular school for teachers.

The history of Waldau Castle contains one event which, on the initiative of local people, was commemorated in 1997 by placing a plaque on the walls of the castle. On 17th (27th) May 1697, the castle hosted Russian emissaries, headed by Admiral Franc Jakovlewitz Lefort (1656 - 1699). The Tsar's chronicler wrote on that day: 'Tsar Peter I arrived on this day to enquire about the well being of the emissaries and to finally confirm the meeting ceremony with Kurfürst (The Prince Elector of the German Reich). In the evening, Tsar Peter I left for Königsburg and the Russian emissaries set off from Waldau early morning the next day.'

Today the castle in Nizovye, despite its old age, makes a great impression on the visitors. Parts of the former castle outbuildings have remained until today and the castle itself still houses an agricultural school.

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Address

A229, Nizov'e, Russia
See all sites in Nizov'e

Details

Founded: 1258
Category: Ruins in Russia

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ольга Мадестова (2 months ago)
Awesome place. When you visit the museum, you immerse yourself in the times of the Knights of the Teutonic Order. Thanks to the excellent guide Galina Vasilievna for immersion in history. This is one of the most iconic places when visiting the Kaliningrad region. I recommend to everyone!
Андрей Осадчук (2 months ago)
An interesting museum, especially the wood carving exposition. Very tasty and inexpensive food at the inn. I think we'll come back more than once.
Ксения Калистратова (4 months ago)
the central castle is under reconstruction, where the basement has been cleaned and barrels are displayed, + a hall with tapestries and a massive table + 3D pictures with paper glasses, which everyone uses in turn. The price tag is completely unjustified. 350 rubles per person without excursion. I am grateful that you are engaged in reconstruction, but at least conduct an excursion for your 350r / h. For comparison, Fort 11 costs 250 with a 40 minute guided tour and there is a lot to wander there. The building on the right has a museum at the castle, and it is interesting, with affordable prices, with a guided tour, history, portraits. Great staff, loving what they do. For the museum - 5. For an unrepaired empty castle for 350 rubles - 2.
Лев Толстой (4 months ago)
Well, maybe I don’t understand something, but paying 350 rubles for bare walls, with the same success, you can go to the abandoned crazy hospital Allenberg) no offense to those who took upon themselves the restoration of this palace. Everything is beautiful on Instagram, in fact the first floor, or rather a room, what to see and that's it.
Natalia I. (9 months ago)
The service could be better
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