The Brandenburg Gate is one of few surviving city gates in Kaliningrad. It was built in the south-western part of Königsberg in 1657, with the strengthening of the city walls at the intersection with the road leading to the castle of Brandenburg (now the village of Ushakovo). Due to lack of funds a mere wooden gate was erected. Some hundred years later the gate was torn down and replaced by a brick structure by order of King Frederick II of Prussia.

During restoration work in 1843 the gate was significantly altered and decorated with sharp decorative pediments, cruciform sandstone color, stylized leaves on the tops, coats of arms and medallions. Sculptures of Field Marshal Hermann von Boyen (1771-1848), a war minister and reformer of the Prussian army, and Lieutenant-General Ernst von Aster (1778-1855), chief of the engineering corps, and one of the initiators of the second strengthening of the city walls, were added as well.

The Brandenburg Gate is the only gate of the still existing gates of Kaliningrad that performs its original transport function. The structure has been restored and is protected by the state as an architectural monument.

Though built in the middle of the 19th century, the Königsberg gates were neogothic in style. The Brandenburg Gate expresses the Gothic motifs particularly vividly. The pediments in the form of arrows give this gate, which is in fact rather low, a sense of height. The gate is richly decorated with decorative elements, such as the high relief stone and stylized flowers.

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Founded: 1657
Category: Castles and fortifications in Russia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Tim H (21 months ago)
Nice piece of living history
Елена Линник (2 years ago)
Piece of Königsberg castle - one of eight gates survived in nowadays Kaliningrad. If you come to see it, get inside. There is a small marzipan museum and a marzipan shop - it will take 5-10 min to look around
Автозапчасти MagReZ (2 years ago)
Small museum
Bonnard Tobar (2 years ago)
There are little places to go in small cities. This is a must go, or at least one of the gates one should visit.
Nick Kharchenko (4 years ago)
The only city gates that still used as a gates. It was reconstructed recently and looks really nice.
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