Kaliningrad Museum of History and Arts

Kaliningrad, Russia

The Kaliningrad Regional Museum of History and Arts, originally a Stadthalle (city hall), was planned by Oberbürgermeister Siegfried Körte in 1907 and opened in the Vorder-Roßgarten district in 1912 according to designs by Richard Seel. It included concert halls, a restaurant, and a garden cafe by the Schlossteich. The Königsberger Philharmonie often performed in the 1,600-seat center. The Stadthalle was used as a military hospital during World War I. The building was heavily damaged by the 26 August 1944 Bombing of Königsberg in World War II. After the war it was part of Soviet Kaliningrad.

The former Stadthalle was restored from 1981-86. Since 1991 it has hosted the Kaliningrad Regional Museum of History and Arts. The museum, founded in 1946, previously had multiple locations throughout the city. It includes exhibits on regional nature, archaeology, history, World War II, and post-war Kaliningrad. The museum also has branches in the city and the Kaliningrad Oblast.

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Category: Museums in Russia

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Павел и Мария Онищук (3 years ago)
Посетили музей с детьми. Очень приветливый персонал. Музей разделен на несколько экспозиций. На первом этаже можно посмотреть чучела животных обитающих в Калининградской области, минералы и полезные ископаемые. Есть зал с картинами. На втором этаже экспозиция про войну 1814 года, взятие Кенигсберга и история Калининградской области. Детям понравилось. Билет стоит 150 рублей. Дети бесплатно.
Josue Escobar (3 years ago)
Boring
Christian Bergener (3 years ago)
In dem Museum wird die Heimatgeschichte von Kaliningrad mit interessanten Objekten gezeigt. Los geht es mit Frühgeschichte bis zur Sowjetzeit. Der 2. Weltkrieg hat eine eigene Ausstellung, sehr anschaulich. Mein persönlicher Favorit ist der Roboter "Neptun". Leider ist das meiste auf Russisch ausgeschildert, für mich kaum zu entziffern. Eine Übersetzung auf Englisch, wie woanders üblich, würde ich wegen der Objekte sehr begrüßen. Trotzdem sehenswert!
Роман Алымов (3 years ago)
Cyber week)
Dmitrii Scornici (4 years ago)
One of the "Must visit", especially private collection of reptiles!
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