Kedainiai Minaret

Kėdainiai, Lithuania

The Kėdainiai minaret is the only free-standing minaret in Lithuania. The minaret was built in 1880 by the Russian general Eduard Totleben, who was an owner of Kėdainiai manor. He built the minaret as a memorial to the Russian-Turkish war in which he had fought. Local legend also says that he built the minaret for his Turkish lover. The minaret is typical of Ottoman architecture. It is needle-topped, 25 meters high and has a balcony which can be reached by interior stairs. There are two plaques affixed to its wall. One is written in Ottoman Turkish and describes a beautiful palace built by the Ottoman sultan.

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Details

Founded: 1880
Category: Statues in Lithuania

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Dov J Balta (5 years ago)
Hidden little gem with historic spices.
giedrius bev (5 years ago)
The park is really nice and minaret has been renovated a bit
Mantas K (5 years ago)
Ones lady suicided by jumping of it, she was high rank war prisoner and this minaret was specially built as a prison for her
Asta Jakstiene (5 years ago)
Gražus vaizdas, bet norėtųsi, kad būtų labiau pritaikyta lankytojams: trūksta suoliukų, šiukšliadėžių.
Karolis Noreika (6 years ago)
Way to this attraction is not very good and should be properly maintained. The location itself should be mainatined better as well but really nice place to do some pictures as the minarer itself is quite extraordinary
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