The Kėdainiai minaret is the only free-standing minaret in Lithuania. The minaret was built in 1880 by the Russian general Eduard Totleben, who was an owner of Kėdainiai manor. He built the minaret as a memorial to the Russian-Turkish war in which he had fought. Local legend also says that he built the minaret for his Turkish lover. The minaret is typical of Ottoman architecture. It is needle-topped, 25 meters high and has a balcony which can be reached by interior stairs. There are two plaques affixed to its wall. One is written in Ottoman Turkish and describes a beautiful palace built by the Ottoman sultan.

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Details

Founded: 1880
Category: Statues in Lithuania

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en.wikipedia.org

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Asta Jakstiene (7 months ago)
Gražus vaizdas, bet norėtųsi, kad būtų labiau pritaikyta lankytojams: trūksta suoliukų, šiukšliadėžių.
Karolis Noreika (8 months ago)
Way to this attraction is not very good and should be properly maintained. The location itself should be mainatined better as well but really nice place to do some pictures as the minarer itself is quite extraordinary
Jūratė Sarapienė (9 months ago)
Siūlau aplankyti,nes nedaug vietų Lietuvoje,kur galima būtų pamatyti minaretą
Vakaris Vingilis (11 months ago)
Puiki ir gražiai sutvarkyta vieta!
Gediminas Kausinis (15 months ago)
Unusual monument in Luthuania, but worth see it when visiting Kedainiai.
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