St. George's Church

Kaunas, Lithuania

The church of St. George was part of the Bernardine Monastery. The first wooden church was built in 1468. It was replaced by the current brick church in the late 15th century and completed before 1503. It’s been ruined by fire three times, suffered the wrath of the Moscow army during the war of 1656-1659 and then had a bit of a rest during the 18th century before Napoleon turned it into a warehouse.

During Soviet times, the church was used to store medicine. It was returned to the Friars in 1993 in a pretty shabby condition, and restoration of its outstanding if run-down Gothic, Renaissance and Baroque interior has been slow to say the least. Ongoing restoration work has seen the addition of a new roof although the church itself remains locked for the foreseeable future.

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Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Religious sites in Lithuania

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Algirdas Tamulis (3 months ago)
Tai yra viena seniausių bažnyčių Kauno senamiestyje (pradėta statyti 1471m., o 1503 jau veikė. Sovietmečiu čia ir vienuolyne buvo medicinos mokykla Nuo 2009 restauruojama ir vis gražėja. Vyksta pamaldos.
Ramon Marcadar (4 months ago)
Bardzo ładny kościół Szkoda że w czasie remontu ciekawe wyposażenie wnętrz niesamowita atmosfera.
Migle Miskelyte (5 months ago)
Pati nuostabiausia,silciausia,jaukiausia baznycia Kaune,nuostabiausi Kunigai myliu juos bei sia Baznycia
Raimis Raimiss (2 years ago)
Ok
Meduolis MD (2 years ago)
Still on renovation but great never the less.
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