St. George's Church

Kaunas, Lithuania

The church of St. George was part of the Bernardine Monastery. The first wooden church was built in 1468. It was replaced by the current brick church in the late 15th century and completed before 1503. It’s been ruined by fire three times, suffered the wrath of the Moscow army during the war of 1656-1659 and then had a bit of a rest during the 18th century before Napoleon turned it into a warehouse.

During Soviet times, the church was used to store medicine. It was returned to the Friars in 1993 in a pretty shabby condition, and restoration of its outstanding if run-down Gothic, Renaissance and Baroque interior has been slow to say the least. Ongoing restoration work has seen the addition of a new roof although the church itself remains locked for the foreseeable future.

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Founded: 15th century
Category: Religious sites in Lithuania

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Dina buntov (5 months ago)
Nice church
Arik Binder (2 years ago)
Old and nice church
Walker Scott (2 years ago)
is this a greenhouse
Michał Kołodziej (2 years ago)
Church is very beautiful and historical from the outside but in the middle of the day you can't get into it. It is closed as many churches in Kaunas.
Danielius Goriunovas (3 years ago)
Big, almost restored to previous beauty and close to the historic city center.
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