St. Michael the Archangel Church

Kaunas, Lithuania

St. Michael the Archangel's Church or the Garrison Church is a Roman Catholic church closing the perspective of the Laisvės alėja, the main pedestrian street. It was built between 1891 and 1895 when Kaunas was part of the Russian empire, in Neo-Byzantine style largely for the use of the Russian Orthodox garrison of Kaunas Fortress.

The church was designed as an Orthodox cathedral of Saints Peter and Paul in 1890 by K. H. Lymarenko. The cathedral was completed in four years and was inaugurated on 17 September 1895. Most of the construction was carried out by workers from Chernigov Governorate, and its art-work was implemented by craftsmen from St. Petersburg.

As usual for military churches of the period, the construction of Kaunas cathedral was financed equally by the Military Ministry and by donations from army servicemen. Completion of the church finalized the administrative building complex of the Kaunas Fortress; it symbolized less the presence of Orthodox Christians than the imperial authority of the Russian government. It was also believed that the church would reduce interdenominational frictions.

After the fall of the Kaunas Fortress during World War I the Germans cut down the church bells and transported them to Germany. The church stayed closed until 1919. In the interwar period the cathedral became a Roman Catholic church of the Lithuanian garrison of Kaunas. During the Soviet occupation, it was used as an art gallery. Nowadays it serves as a Roman Catholic church.

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Details

Founded: 1891-1895
Category: Religious sites in Lithuania

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Eglė Ž. (5 months ago)
One of the most beautiful building in Kaunas
Lukas (6 months ago)
Perhaps not the most interesting place, yet is nice to see historical church and experience blind's way in the tunnel underneath the building.
Arvis K, (7 months ago)
A key figure in Laisves (Freedom) avenue axis and a dominant building in Nepriklausomybes (Independence) sq. The church has relatively short (just a bit more than 120 years) but vibrant history. Now it badly needs renovation. When renovation is done, the place is definitely 5*
Luka Panourgia (9 months ago)
Used to be the Pride of Kaunas and the most beautiful Church on the main Avenue of Liberty ("Laisves Aleja") but in these days negligence to renovate it, made this Church very ugly and this makes me terribly sad. This Church is seen from far away and is dearly loved by all citizens of Kaunas. To keep it in this state is pure disgrace when Kaunas gets so many visitors and it is situated in such a prominent location!
Karolina Rut (9 months ago)
Absolutely lovely place for the visit. Heart of city center, amazing gallery of Mikalojus Konstantinas Ciurlionis-famous lithuanian artist and composer is more than worthy to see. The churt itself is fenmenon and historical object, always worthy to visit too. You can even get a tour to the dongeons! Amazing accses by public transport from any part of Kaunas. Its a must visit destination!
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