Hakasalmi Villa

Helsinki, Finland

Hakasalmi Villa was built in 1843 by the procurator and privy counsellor Carl Johan Walleen as a combined city and country residence. The architect was E.B. Lohrmann from Berlin. Two wings were added to the front of the main building in 1847, the north one served as a bakery and the south one as a greenhouse. The villa was surrounded by a large English garden.

The municipality of Helsinki bought Hakasalmi from Aurora Karamzin in 1896. After her death the historical museum of state was moved to the villa. Since 1911 it has been owned by Helsinki city museum. Today there are changing exhibitions. The villa itself is one of the rare empire-style buldingins still existing in Helsinki.

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Details

Founded: 1843
Category: Museums in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

More Information

www.hel.fi
www.museot.fi

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mikko Forsström (2 years ago)
A very nice museum.
HillaryKills (2 years ago)
Very nice area and a large lot. Not sure if this is common but we were here for a gathering and had the place rented out. A ton of space outdoors to mingle and a lot of room inside to lean back and relax or seek shelter from outdoors.
Pekka Tuominen (2 years ago)
The 20's exhibition seems well researched, but maybe all the graphics is a little heavy on the eyes. More of the wi dows might have been left uncovered and still made for an atmospheric show.
Oona Pie (2 years ago)
Cool villa with nice exhibits, specially suitable for showing photographs or paintings, could easily be added value with some live music performances.
Anne Amison (2 years ago)
We really enjoyed our visit to this lovely little museum. The exhibition on Helsinki in the 1920s was interesting and informative.
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