Hakasalmi Villa

Helsinki, Finland

Hakasalmi Villa was built in 1843 by the procurator and privy counsellor Carl Johan Walleen as a combined city and country residence. The architect was E.B. Lohrmann from Berlin. Two wings were added to the front of the main building in 1847, the north one served as a bakery and the south one as a greenhouse. The villa was surrounded by a large English garden.

The municipality of Helsinki bought Hakasalmi from Aurora Karamzin in 1896. After her death the historical museum of state was moved to the villa. Since 1911 it has been owned by Helsinki city museum. Today there are changing exhibitions. The villa itself is one of the rare empire-style buldingins still existing in Helsinki.

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Details

Founded: 1843
Category: Museums in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

More Information

www.hel.fi
www.museot.fi

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Steven Regsby (13 months ago)
Nice place
jinnie kim (22 months ago)
free entrance and right next to finlandia hall by aalto.
Dani Carroza (22 months ago)
Lovely little museum! It’s free, people is so friendly and has a small coffee shop.
Manolo Escobar (2 years ago)
We are a honeymooning couple from Spain, and we went to nearly every coffee shop in Helsinki, this being our true favourite, even over Eckbergs. My wife is lactose intolerant and not only did she have no problems but everything was delicious. We especially enjoyed the feta and the salmon pie and the carrot cake. And the coffee was also very good. And the owner is a very nice and attentive guy.
Ekku Pinola (2 years ago)
Nice place to drink coffee or tea and have some snacks
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