All Saints Church

Nyköping, Sweden

All Saints (Alla Helgona) Church was built in the late 1200s, but during the Duke Karl's time (1590-1618) it went through a radical transformation. At the restoration in 1909 the church received its small ridge turrets, which is a replica of the tower on Erik Dahlberg´s engravings of Nyköping. In 1665 the church was ravaged by fire. At the recent restoration in 1959-1960 were the pillars restored in to original condition, limestone from the island of Öland.

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Details

Founded: 1590-1618
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Early Vasa Era (Sweden)

More Information

www.nykopingsguiden.se

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Anna Granat (11 months ago)
En vacker kyrka
Peter Blomdahl (12 months ago)
Unik kyrka gjord i betong.
Kerstin Öhrvall (12 months ago)
Fin gammal kyrka från 12-hundralet.
Terje Eide (12 months ago)
Mycket trevlig plats med omnejd runt Östra torget i Nyköping. Inbjudande.
Helena Hjelm (2 years ago)
Vacker trägård gott fika hembakat
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