All Saints Church

Nyköping, Sweden

All Saints (Alla Helgona) Church was built in the late 1200s, but during the Duke Karl's time (1590-1618) it went through a radical transformation. At the restoration in 1909 the church received its small ridge turrets, which is a replica of the tower on Erik Dahlberg´s engravings of Nyköping. In 1665 the church was ravaged by fire. At the recent restoration in 1959-1960 were the pillars restored in to original condition, limestone from the island of Öland.

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Details

Founded: 1590-1618
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Early Vasa Era (Sweden)

More Information

www.nykopingsguiden.se

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ulf Slottenäs (4 months ago)
The wingspan of history feels clear and thinks of all the centuries where parishioners listened to the word of the Lord in this very beautiful church, but a little hidden - despite its central location ... Definitely worth a visit. Dating back to the 13th century.
Lena Johansson (6 months ago)
Extra exciting that there was a rune stone walled in the wall. Several interesting changes in the church, such as modern pillars and lamps.
Jan Bergman (8 months ago)
Nice and historically interesting church that both feels grandly magnificent but at the same time quite intimate. Opposite the church is Prosten Pihls which has affordable coffee service in a wonderful historical environment weekdays between 13-15.30
Simon Larsson (2 years ago)
Nothing much to see, but could be a good stop on a walk exploring the town. The yard across the street is much more worthwhile, if it's open.
Simon Larsson (2 years ago)
Nothing much to see, but could be a good stop on a walk exploring the town. The yard across the street is much more worthwhile, if it's open.
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