Släbro Rock Carvings

Nyköping, Sweden

Släbro is without question one of Sweden’s greatest and most remarkable rock carvings site. Situated near the River of Nyköping the carvings were discovered 1984 and can be dated back to the Bronze Age. They are unique because they are carved in a most unusual way. There are etchings on some ten different surfaces with a total of some 700 figures, mainly frame and circle figures. Many are unique in design, in particular the large stylised human figures in a position of adoration. The characteristics commonly found throughout carvings in the South of Sweden are missing. What is more, the Släbro carvings seem to bear no similarity to any other ancient carvings that have been discovered throughout Europe. The carvings date from 1800 – 400 BC and thus far the meaning behind them remains something of a mystery as it has proven to be extremely difficult to interpret the motif as it appears in literally hundreds of different ways.

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Details

Founded: 1800-400 BC
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Sweden
Historical period: Neolithic Age (Sweden)

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lina Lagnesten Cederin (2 years ago)
Stillsam plats
Simon Bergmark (2 years ago)
Ganska medioker plats. Kom hit med förväntningar om en forntida kvarlämning utan motstycke. Visade sig vara berg med klotter på. Hunden hade dock rätt kul. Stora ytor. Skulle nog inte rekommendera att ta sig tiden att besöka denna plats, men råkar du vandra förbi kan det vara kul att slå sig en titt. I några sekunder.
Thommy Andersson (2 years ago)
Klipper gräsmattan där kan tänka hur de var på den tiden dom rista in på berget
Claire Panman - van der Meer (2 years ago)
Beautiful ancient artwork, but in two of the three places we found it very hard to see the drawings. Still absolutely worth the visit.
Confiteor Mea Culpa (2 years ago)
Norr om Nyköping finns det gott om runstenar och hällristningar. Släbro var en mötesplats för redan 2000 år sedan. Hällristningarna i Släbro upptäcktes så sent som 1984, och de är unika eftersom att man ingen annan stans i världen har funnit samma tecken och bilder som de här. De lärda lär tvista om innebörden. Det lär finnas minst 400 hällristningar inknackade i berget alldeles intill Nyköpings å. Det sägs att det unika med Släbroristningen är den enhetliga och ovanliga stil rustningarna knackats in i. Släbro Hällristningar är väl värt ett besök och en kaffekorg rekommenderas att ta med sig
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