Bartoszyce Church

Bartoszyce, Poland

The origin of Bartoszyce Church is unknown. It was probably build on place of the castle chapel, of which we have some information from 1404, destroyed together with the castle half a century later by the inhabitants of Bartoszyce. The second medieval church in Bartoszyce, at Nowowiejskiego Street, is a simple, monolayer structure following a rectangle plan. Probably it originates from the XV century, although there are some assumptions that it could have been build already in the period of first city location. The bell tower has been added to the facade in the 19th century. The altar and pulpit supported by an angel are an example of Baroque carving of the first quarter of 18th century.

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Founded: 14th century
Category: Religious sites in Poland

More Information

www.pieknywschod.pl

Rating

3.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Małgorzata Brodawska (14 months ago)
Brother Albert's church is very beautiful and it's good to pray there because there are good pews. Thanks to KS Władysław and people of good will, these people from this estate and the surrounding area have a house where Jesus Christ resides and lives in the Labernacle, so we do not turn away from the church because faith and love to the other person is really needed
Karol Szulzycki (3 years ago)
Nothing more to add ?
Piotr Jaźwiński (4 years ago)
To nie jest kościół wybudowany w starym stylu , ale i tak czuć w zniosłą atmosferę
Piotr Jaźwiński (4 years ago)
This is not a church built in the old style, but still feel a lonely atmosphere
Karika W (4 years ago)
Kościół sam w sobie jest ładny w środku. Ale na zewnatrz każdy widzi...od lat zbierane są pieniądze od mieszkańców a prace idą powolnie. Pewnie dlatego by móc zbierać do samego końca. Szkoda że msze dla dzieci nie są fajne A kiedyś byly
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