St. John's Church

Helsinki, Finland

St. John’s Church was built between 1888-1891. It was designed by A. E. Melander, who win the design competition in 1878. St. John’s Church is most remarkable sample of neo-gothic church architecture in Finland. It’s also biggest stone church in Finland with 2600 seats.

The twin towers are 74 metres in height, and the church has excellent acoustics. It’s therefore used for big concerts and events as well as services. The altarpiece shows Saul's conversion and the painting, called A Divine Revelation, is by Eero Järnefelt, brother-in-law to Jean Sibelius.

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Details

Founded: 1888-1891
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Balázs Kádár (2 years ago)
Nice building, this inside is very big end authentic
George On tour (2 years ago)
St. John's Church in Helsinki, Finland is a Lutheran church designed by the Swedish architect Adolf Melander in the Gothic Revival style. It is the largest stone church in Finland by seating capacity. Situated in the Ullanlinna district of Helsinki, the church was built between 1888 and 1891, the third Lutheran church in Helsinki, and still the biggest. The twin towers are 74 metres in height, and the church seats 2,600 people and has excellent acoustics, and it is therefore used for big concerts and events as well as services
Magia 2000 Magia2000 (2 years ago)
Nice church in the design district of .... beautiful organ and on Tuesday they play organ at 5pm
Sandro Mathys (2 years ago)
Stunning from the outside, simple yet beautiful on the inside.
t.loliacea (2 years ago)
Beautiful! This church is not frequented by many tourists, another reason for you to visit it - it will be very quiet, as a place of worship should be. Besides, it is in a nice neighborhood and close to the Design Museum.
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