Tuomarinkylä Manor Museum

Helsinki, Finland

The history of Tuomarinkylä Manor dates back to the 15th century. The present main manor house was built around 1790. Today the main building is a museum and there’s also a horse farm and restaurant. The fairly small museum has eight room carefully restored in the style of different periods over the last two hundred years.

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Details

Founded: ca. 1790
Category: Museums in Finland
Historical period: The Age of Enlightenment (Finland)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Thor Hauer (11 months ago)
Har handlet blomster der de siste tre årene og harvært fornøyd bortsett fra siste gangen da rosene jeg kjøpe holdt kun i 3 dager.
markku nurmi (11 months ago)
Josko tänne joku eksyy löytyy täältä vaate myyntiä ja kahvio, niitä ennen on ohitettu ratsastustallit.
Eelis Silee (13 months ago)
Ok
Rebecca Tykkyläinen (15 months ago)
Todella upea paikka jossa on paljon nähtävää ja ihasteltavaa! Niin kaunis ja rauhallinen paikka jossa todellakin menee kauniilla päivällä koko päivä täälä kierrellessä ja ihastelemassa hevosia, museota, kauniita maisemia sekä myös löytyy kahvio jossa oikein mukava käydä kierroksien yhteydessä. Jos täälä ei ole koskaan ennen käynyt niin nyt tosissaan tavoitteeksi täällä käyminen niin varmasti käyt myös toisen kerran. Todella ihana ja upea paikka.
Joe San Miguel (19 months ago)
Quiet place to work on art
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