The greystone church in Parainen was built in the 15th century (probably in 1440-1460) and is dedicated to St. Simon. The western part of the Agricola-chapel is the eldest component of the church, today a museum. On the churchyard is located the chapel of bishop Tengström, Finland's first archbishop (erected in 1819). The interior of the church is covered with several coat of arms. The rarest one is dedicated to pope Innocentius III.

National Board of Antiquities has named the church and the surrounding Vanha Malmi old town as national built heritage.

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Details

Founded: 1440-1460
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: Middle Ages (Finland)

More Information

www.muuka.com

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Markus Suominen (3 years ago)
A beautiful 13th century village church. Well worth visiting.
Atooh (3 years ago)
jag så int dejj i kyrkan idag gud förlåter inte muslimer
Marko M (3 years ago)
Keskiaikainen harmaakivikirkko on aina kunnon kirkko, eikä Paraisten keskiaikainen harmaakivikirkko tee poikkeusta siinä asiassa. Todella upea ja värikäs, kannattaa käydä.
Erkki Kaurinkoski (3 years ago)
Täällä on minut vihitty,poikani siunattu haudanlepoon ja tyttäreni vihitty avioliittoon.
Per-Erik Häggman (3 years ago)
Pargas kyrka är unik stenkyrka , fint restaurerd väl värt ett besök!
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