Parainen Church

Parainen, Finland

The greystone church in Parainen was built in the 15th century (probably in 1440-1460) and is dedicated to St. Simon. The western part of the Agricola-chapel is the eldest component of the church, today a museum. On the churchyard is located the chapel of bishop Tengström, Finland's first archbishop (erected in 1819). The interior of the church is covered with several coat of arms. The rarest one is dedicated to pope Innocentius III.

National Board of Antiquities has named the church and the surrounding Vanha Malmi old town as national built heritage.

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Details

Founded: 1440-1460
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: Middle Ages (Finland)

More Information

www.muuka.com

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

AJ Jurvanen (7 months ago)
Great medieval pictures
Adam Pettersson (15 months ago)
Nice Church with lots of history and interesting facts.
Millie Cheng (22 months ago)
When the church near grave, I don’t have dare to enter So I just take a look outside
tharas (2 years ago)
Met Jesus here, he's a cool guy.
Markus Suominen (5 years ago)
A beautiful 13th century village church. Well worth visiting.
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