Brinkhall Manor

Turku, Finland

Brinkhall manor house dates back to the 16th century. The current main building was built in 1793 and it was the first neo-classical manor house in Finland. It was designed by Gabriel von Bondorff. The interior is from 1920s. Brinkhall is also known as remarkable gardens. The English garden was one of the first in this style in Finland in the beginning of 19th century.

The manor is today owned by the Finnish Cultural Heritage Foundation. Brinkhall´s premises are available for meetings, conferences and private parties or functions. A summer café also operates at Brinkhall.

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Details

Founded: 1793
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Finland
Historical period: The Age of Enlightenment (Finland)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ari Vaahtera (13 months ago)
Kiva paikka, varsinkin uimaranta toisella puolella tietä.
Markku Vähätalo (13 months ago)
Kävin kahviossa, se ok. Kaunis sisustus.
Olli Mustonen (14 months ago)
Jos kartanot ja niiden historia kiinnostaa, tässä sinulle sopiva kohde. Opastettu kierros kartanossa oli perusteellinen ja asiantunteva. (7,5€/henki, v.2018) Kahvila on valoisa ja raparperipiirakka maukas. WC siisti. Käynnin jälkeen voi suositella Hovimäki - sarjan katsomista, joka kuvattu pääosin täällä.
Kristian Wahlbeck (14 months ago)
Kultur- och byggnadshistoriskt intressant herrgård med trevligt kafe. Trädgården har förfallit, och inredningen har knappast alls bevarats. Priset för en guidad tur (7,50 €) är rätt högt, och Museikortet gäller inte här.
cubix63 (15 months ago)
niille jotka pitävät historiasta on kartano ympäristöineen loistava paikka. Tiesittekö muuten, että Hovimäki sarja kuvattiin ks. paikassa? Luonnosta ja valokuvaamisesta tykkäävät löytävät mukavia luontoon liittyviä kohteita samoin ne jotka tykkäävät kuvat rakennuksia löytyy mielenkiintoisia yksityiskohtia.
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