Transfiguration Church

Veliky Novgorod, Russia

The Church of the Transfiguration of the Savior is a former Russian Orthodox Church built in 1374 and frescoed by Theophanes the Greek (Feofan Grek or Феофан Грек in Russian) in 1378. Substantial portions of those frescoes still remain, including the Christ Pantocrator in the dome, a number of saints inside the south entrance, and The Old Testament Trinity in the western vestry, as well as others. The current building is now a museum, part of the Novgorod State Museum-Preserve.

A church stood on the site since at least the 12th century. The Icon of Our Lady of the Sign was originally housed there. According to a famous legend, in 1169, Archbishop Ilya brought the icon out of the church and across the Volkhov River to the Detinets during a siege of the city by the Suzdalians. The icon is said to have miraculously saved the city. Because of this, the icon and the broader episode came to symbolize the city and its independence, and were depicted in several icons of the battle, one of which is on display in the Novgorod Museum in the Detinets. The icon itself was later transferred to the Church of Our Lady of the Sign, which was built in the latter 17th century next to the Church of the Transfiguration especially to house the icon. It was kept in a museum during the Soviet period and is now housed in the Saint Sophia Cathedral where it is displayed just in front of the main iconostasis.

In addition to being something of a pilgrimage site for the famous icon, the chronicles also note that the Church of the Transfiguration, which stood just inside the eastern gates of the city, was often the place where the Novgorodians met their archbishop or other dignitaries upon their arrival in the city from Moscow (for instance, after the archbishop's consecration or following other trips to that city, or when Byzantine or other church dignitaries such as the metropolitan visited the city.) It was one of the first places a traveler would come to in the city as he passed down Ilyin Street to the market or passed over the great bridge into the Detinets. Thus, the clergy and the people, displaying icons and crosses, often met their archbishop there and then processed with him through the market and over the bridge to the cathedral and archiepiscopal palace in the Detinets.

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Details

Founded: 1374
Category: Religious sites in Russia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Элеонора Моисеева (10 months ago)
Most valuable. Paintings by Theophanes the Greek. It's worth seeing. Photos do not convey the scale of beauty. It's worth seeing.
Светлана Завьялова (12 months ago)
I come here often. At different times of the year. For me, this place is the point of truth. Place of power. Just watch. You don't have to go inside. A place where you understand the futility of words and look for support in the present ... Now the approach to the church is very difficult. The asphalt was removed around and everything was dug up. But it’s fine too. Because you can find something interesting. Old bricks and fragments of dishes appeared on the surface. The past breathes from the depths.
Konstantin Gus (2 years ago)
Old place , very rarely open in good weather only. Has fresk of Feofan Greek. In reality the problem is groups with lecturers , entering without queue and any legal permission. You may wait useless fir 2h or more. But people is nice , and you can really enjoy view.
hlpu willi (3 years ago)
Peaceful
Pavel Polinyakin (3 years ago)
Центр культурно-просветительской жизни Великого Новгорода.
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