National Museum of Denmark

Copenhagen, Denmark

The National Museum of Denmark (Nationalmuseet) is Denmark’s largest museum of cultural history, comprising the histories of Danish and foreign cultures, alike. The museum's main domicile is located a short distance from Strøget. It contains exhibits from around the world, from Greenland to South America.

The museum has a number of national commitments, particularly within the following key areas: archaeology, ethnology,numismatics, ethnography, natural science, conservation, communication, building antiquarian activities in connection with the churches of Denmark as well as the handling of the Danefæ (the National Treasures).

The museum covers 14,000 years of Danish history, from the reindeer-hunters of the Ice Age, Vikings and works of art created in praise of God in the Middle Ages, when the church played a huge role in Danish life. Danish coins from Viking times to the present and coins from ancientRome and Greece, as well as examples of the coinage and currencies of other cultures are exhibited also. Furthermore the National Museum keeps Denmark’s largest and most varied collection of objects from the ancient cultures of Greece and Italy, the Near East and Egypt. For example, it holds a collection of objects that were retrieved during the Danish excavation of Tell Shemshara in Iraq in 1957. In addition to this, there are exhibits about who the Danish people are and were, stories of everyday life and special occasions, stories of the Danish state and nation, but most of all stories of different people’s lives in Denmark from 1560 to 2000.

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Category: Museums in Denmark

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Robert Prol (2 months ago)
Wonderful museum with lots of ideas for us Danish Modern lovers. We really enjoyed our time in this museum. It's well laid out, and the exhibits are nicely organized. The food was good in the cafeteria.
Thomas Just Sørensen (3 months ago)
Wonderful museum, in particular worth a visit if you have kids. The children's museum is one of a kind. Be prepared to stay for hours, bring plenty of water, and dress the small ones in layers. They will exhaust themselves if you let them. The rest of the museum is worth a visit. In particular the areas on Denmark.
Johan Møller (3 months ago)
Amazing exhibition. The best I have seen from the national museum. Engaging, interesting and beautifully executed. Thanks to the danish designer Jim Lyngvild and the new management of the museum. There are tons of people here and everyone seems excited and blown away. I hope the rest of the danish museums will be inspired from this. This is the way you get more people into the museums. Educate, Excite and Engage ...
Socratis S. (3 months ago)
Its one of the most detailed Museum I've ever been. You get a well rounded idea of life from even before bronze age till now . Of course priorities Danish history as a whole but you can also find artifacts from other places of the world such as the Mediterranean .A must if you travel for knowledge of history
Andreas Offenhäuser (4 months ago)
Great place to get a very wide range of Denmark's history. From stone age to latest pop culture. Exhibitions are explained in Danish and English. Especially the 'secret' interactive events placed throughout the museum make it a special experience. 2-3 hours of you stroll through the entire place.
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