The Caritas Well (Caritasbrønden) is the oldest fountain in Copenhagen. It was built in 1608 by Christian IV and is located on Gammeltorv, now part of the Strøget pedestrian zone. It is considered one of the city's finest Renaissance monuments.

The Caritas Well is a result of a relocation and modernization of an older fountain erected by Frederik II. He provided for the construction of a 6km long water tube from Lake Emdrup north of the city to Gammel Torv. The altitude difference being 9 metres, the water pressure was adequate for a fountain to be constructed. Though ornamental in character, the well was also part of the city's water supply system.

The figure group is originally carved in wood by the German wood carver Statius Otto in Elsinore for casts afterwards to be made in bronze. The figures depict the greatest of the three theological virtues love or charity, caritas in latin, symbolized by a pregnant mother with her children. The figures stand on a column in a copper basin. The copper basin is raised above a lower basin on a stone pillar. The woman sprays water from her breasts while her little boy 'pees' into the basin.

On the Queen's birthday, copperballs covered in 24 carat gold, symbolizing golden apples, jump in the fountain. The tradition goes back to the 18th century.

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Founded: 1608
Category:
Historical period: Early Modern Denmark (Denmark)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

This Order (5 months ago)
Nice fountain in the old Town centre of Copenhagen
Simon Winther Schor (6 months ago)
Nice square. Maily populated by tourists and pigeons.
Baldur Baldursson (6 months ago)
This old fountain is beautiful and historical. Fun and has a fun story and usage (queen birthday).
javier Bogantes (9 months ago)
Nice music some time!!
B B (9 months ago)
A funny statue where there comes water from al kind of places haha.
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