The Caritas Well (Caritasbrønden) is the oldest fountain in Copenhagen. It was built in 1608 by Christian IV and is located on Gammeltorv, now part of the Strøget pedestrian zone. It is considered one of the city's finest Renaissance monuments.

The Caritas Well is a result of a relocation and modernization of an older fountain erected by Frederik II. He provided for the construction of a 6km long water tube from Lake Emdrup north of the city to Gammel Torv. The altitude difference being 9 metres, the water pressure was adequate for a fountain to be constructed. Though ornamental in character, the well was also part of the city's water supply system.

The figure group is originally carved in wood by the German wood carver Statius Otto in Elsinore for casts afterwards to be made in bronze. The figures depict the greatest of the three theological virtues love or charity, caritas in latin, symbolized by a pregnant mother with her children. The figures stand on a column in a copper basin. The copper basin is raised above a lower basin on a stone pillar. The woman sprays water from her breasts while her little boy 'pees' into the basin.

On the Queen's birthday, copperballs covered in 24 carat gold, symbolizing golden apples, jump in the fountain. The tradition goes back to the 18th century.

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Founded: 1608
Category:
Historical period: Early Modern Denmark (Denmark)

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en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Arun Kumar (20 months ago)
Caritas fountain is also called Caritas Well . This made in 2608 by Christian 4 and is located on Gammeltorv. This place is known for Golden apples jumping on the birthday day of the birthday of Denmark Queen. This is now a part of pedestrian zone here
Carol Chiang (2 years ago)
Christmas market had lot of food
Claes Thomsen (2 years ago)
Boring place
李小乐 (2 years ago)
Really beautiful and scenic.
Ross Armour (2 years ago)
Very pretty park with nice walks around with statues, swans, bridges, fountains and the like. Very scenic and pretty. It is also home to the little mermaid statue which unfortunately constantly has a crowd around it waiting to get pictures with it. If you wait you will get a good picture but you might have to wait a while. The rest of the park however is clean and pretty in all seasons but especially summer.
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