Herlufsholm Church

Næstved, Denmark

Herlufsholm Church is Denmark's broadest single nave church and was the monastery church for the Woodland Monastery of the Benedictine Order. The church dates back to 1135. When Herluf Trolle and his wife Birgitte Goeye acquired the monastery in 1560, the church was renamed Herlufsholm and it became the area's parish church. In the chapel under the choir, Herluf Trolle and Birgitte Goeye lay buried. They are also remembered in an epitaph. In the northern arm of the choir there is a sepulchral monument to Marcus Goeye with an epitaph by Thomas Kingo. The jewel of the church is an ivory crucifix, a 75cm high and carved from a single tusk - one of Denmark's finest works of art.

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Details

Founded: 1135
Category: Religious sites in Denmark
Historical period: The First Kingdom (Denmark)

More Information

www.visitdenmark.com

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jan Fog Langetoft (10 months ago)
Kirken er ny restaureret og står meget flot i et af Danmarks dejligste steder
Jacob Rasmussen (11 months ago)
Beautiful, large and cozy church with an exciting history
Kim Andersen (11 months ago)
A really nice church in beautiful surroundings. However, the pastor is a bit boring ??
Poul Krag (2 years ago)
Fantasticly beautiful. A whole wonderfully beautiful church. A church that we know from the many TV transmissions from Herlufsholm Boarding School. See the tombstones behind the altar - a rare experience. Definitely worth a visit and a detour. Remember to take a walk on the boarding school's beautiful area down towards Susåen.
Niels Jensen (2 years ago)
Nice church with many modern features. Open to public when no service.
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