Herlufsholm Church

Næstved, Denmark

Herlufsholm Church is Denmark's broadest single nave church and was the monastery church for the Woodland Monastery of the Benedictine Order. The church dates back to 1135. When Herluf Trolle and his wife Birgitte Goeye acquired the monastery in 1560, the church was renamed Herlufsholm and it became the area's parish church. In the chapel under the choir, Herluf Trolle and Birgitte Goeye lay buried. They are also remembered in an epitaph. In the northern arm of the choir there is a sepulchral monument to Marcus Goeye with an epitaph by Thomas Kingo. The jewel of the church is an ivory crucifix, a 75cm high and carved from a single tusk - one of Denmark's finest works of art.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1135
Category: Religious sites in Denmark
Historical period: The First Kingdom (Denmark)

More Information

www.visitdenmark.com

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Poul Krag (11 months ago)
Fantasticly beautiful. A whole wonderfully beautiful church. A church that we know from the many TV transmissions from Herlufsholm Boarding School. See the tombstones behind the altar - a rare experience. Definitely worth a visit and a detour. Remember to take a walk on the boarding school's beautiful area down towards Susåen.
Niels Jensen (12 months ago)
Nice church with many modern features. Open to public when no service.
Helen Girsel (12 months ago)
Beautiful concert.
Leif Bonde (14 months ago)
Competent church staff. Graves that were well prepared and showed great hospitality and guidance at funerals in collaboration with undertakers from the company Bedre Begravelse.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Bamberg Historic City Centre

Bamberg is located in Upper Franconia on the river Regnitz close to its confluence with the river Main. Its historic city center is a listed UNESCO world heritage site.

Bamberg is a good example of a central European town with a basically early medieval plan and many surviving ecclesiastical and secular buildings of the medieval period. When Henry II, Duke of Bavaria, became King of Germany in 1007 he made Bamberg the seat of a bishopric, intended to become a 'second Rome'. Of particular interest is the way in which the present town illustrates the link between agriculture (market gardens and vineyards) and the urban distribution centre.

From the 10th century onwards, Bamberg became an important link with the Slav peoples, especially those of Poland and Pomerania. During its period of greatest prosperity, from the 12th century onwards, the architecture of this town strongly influenced northern Germany and Hungary. In the late 18th century Bamberg was the centre of the Enlightenment in southern Germany, with eminent philosophers and writers such as Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel and E.T.A. Hoffmann living there.

Bamberg extends over seven hills, each crowned by a beautiful church. This has led to Bamberg being called the 'Franconian Rome'.