Fort De Roovere was part of the West Brabant Dutch Water Line. It is an earthen fort that goes through a wall (the Ligneweg) and is connected to Fort Pinssen. The fort is open from the ‘back’, and the ‘front’ consists of two bastions. The fort has a dry moat and the banks are overgrown with trees. In 1747, during the Austrian War of Succession (1740–1748) the fort was under siege by the French. This siege has been extensively documented. Eventually, the fortress Bergen op Zoom fell and the siege was abandoned.

Over the years, the de Roovere fort has fallen into major disrepair. It has only recently been restored through contributions. In addition, a bridge was built to access the fort across its moat. The designers felt it would be inappropriate to build a bridge over the moat, so instead, they decided to construct a partially submerged bridge, rendering it practically invisible. The bridge has taken on the name 'The Moses Bridge,' as it appears to have divided the moat's waters. This design allows people to cross virtually undetected at water level: only a few bobbing heads are usually visible. Its construction is entirely of wood waterproofed with foil.

A foundation has been established, Friends of Fort de Roovere, whose goal is to make sure the fort is not forgotten. In the middle of 2010, extensive renovation of the fort began with the removal of the undergrowth and a deepening of the old moat so that the fort could be more easily recognizable as such. The clearing of the area led to many local protests. Remarkably, very little to no interest was paid toarcheological research as there should be traces of the French siege nearby. Local amateurs with metal detectors still regularly findcannonballs there, which must have come from the siege.

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Founded: 1628
Category: Castles and fortifications in Netherlands

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Justin van Schaick (3 years ago)
Site of an old Dutch fort that was an important part of the Dutch defense lines called the "Waterlinie", meant to keep invading armies out of the country using a system of flooding to halt their advance. It's not an actual structure; just a earthen construction. It might have had wooden barracks at some point but they are gone now. A single cannon remains. There has been some reconstruction going on to restore the earth walls in their former state and deepen the moats. There's a modern observation tower constructed of wood and steel that offers a nice view of the area. Unfortunately not accessible for the disabled (stairs). Free parking. Some short walking trails in the area. Cafe with patio at the fort.
Patrice Solyomvary (3 years ago)
Very nice, almost hidden old fortress. We accidentally found out about it during our visit of the extremely beautiful village of Tholen. They are still renovating a lot and actually building some kind of tower. Of course, what we really enjoyed was walking through the water, as a matter of speach. Amazingly build walk-through, never seen anything like it. Definitely worth a visit if you are in or around Tholen.
Koert Grever (3 years ago)
The new tower is truly spectacular and worth a visit !
Katka Kretka (3 years ago)
Very pretty place to be, with a great bridge and a tower for good view.. and great plans for the future
Paulo Afonso (3 years ago)
One can call a hidden beauty, as you approach the area is not quite evident at first glance. I went on a 15 min bike trip last week on a beautiful spring sunny Sunday. It’s an astonishing landmark proof of men and nature at work in harmony. Probably still underrated, all I can say is that the pictures don’t quite describe the experience vividly. From the top of the tower you have an amazing peripheral view of your surroundings and the fort itself. There is a café to serve visitors and safe bring along children. The history describing the maps on the location are in dutch, but perhpaps there are translation on line. Overall... an amazing destination to visit.
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