Ravlunda Church

Kivik, Sweden

Ravlunda church was built around 1200. It is typical Scanian in its design with the east apse, cows, nave and tower. Brick arches and vaults were filled with mural paintings in the 1400s, maybe by the Vittskövle Master. The church porch and tower were probably built also in the 1400s. The expansion to the north is considered to come from the 1600s. The altar dates from 1592 and the pulpit from 1609.

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Address

Kyrkobacken 7, Kivik, Sweden
See all sites in Kivik

Details

Founded: c. 1200
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

enjoysweden.se

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

roger wåhlin (2 years ago)
En fantastisk plats där du har en vacker utsikt både inåt landet och ut över kusten. Där ligger också två kända herrar begravna. En som sköt upp allt till morgondagen och en som sjöng om det gåtfulla folket
Ulf Hansson (2 years ago)
Utflykt till Piratens grav.
Roger Judinsson (3 years ago)
Jag hann iallafall med ett besök.
Alf Engdahl (3 years ago)
Det underbara läget, den välskötta byggnaden med dess stämnings- och sinnesfridsfyllda interiör, den magnifika utsikten, kyrkorummets starka andliga stämning och, naturligtvis, Piratens anspråkslösa gravsten gör Ravlunda kyrka till en av Sveriges tjugo viktigaste besöksmål; vinter, vår, sommar och höst. Måste besökas, så enkelt är det!
Bu Bu (4 years ago)
Beautiful place, amazing church
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