The Untamala Archaeology Centre

Laitila, Finland

The Untamala Archaeology Centre is an archaeological exhibition centre founded by the National Board of Antiquities. The centre is situated in the midst of southwestern Finland’s rural landscape and by the famous iron-age graveyard.

The Untamala Archaeology Centre distributes knowledge about archaeological cultural heritage and cultural landscape and promotes their conservation and management. The centre offers a variety of information, activities and sights for tourists, school children and others interested in antiquities. “The Centuries of Southwestern Finland” exhibition is situated in the first floor of the centre; there one can find out about the region’s prehistory and cultural landscape and how the landscape was formed. In addition, the exhibition gives information about the conservation and management of relics in Finland.

From the Archaeology Center starts a 2.5 km long, signposted culture pathway. It presents examples of human traces from various historical periods. In walking tour you can see for example early Iron Age mound cemetery, three sacrificial stones and the wooden church of Untamala (built in 1785).

Reference: National Board Of Antiques

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Details

Founded: 0-600 AD
Category: Museums in Finland
Historical period: Iron Age (Finland)

More Information

www.nba.fi
www.pcl-eu.de

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