Sønderskov Manor

Brorup, Denmark

Sønderskov Manor is mentioned for the first time in 1448. After 1536 the owner built a new main wing with two diagonally placed defensive towers because the nobility feared new peasants’ revolts like those they had experienced during the Count’s Feud.

About 1614 Sønderskov was destroyed by fire but the owner, Thomas Juel, rebuilt it, and the new manor was finished in 1620. He was a wealthy man who owned three manor houses, and he served King Christian IV in various functions. Part of his prosperity was due to the fattening of bullocks for export.

In 1720 Hans Bachmann became the first non-noble squire at Sønderskov. He and his successor Samuel Nicolaus Claudius transformed Sønderskov into the Baroque manor house, which can still be seen today. During a thorough restoration in the years 1986-1992 several unique wall-paintings and a decorated wooden ceiling from the second half of the 17th century were discovered.

Today Sønderskov is housing the regional museum and the Baroque garden and parts of the kitchen- and herb gardens have been recreated.

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Details

Founded: 1614-1620
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Denmark
Historical period: Early Modern Denmark (Denmark)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Betty Poulsen (2 years ago)
Smukt restaureret .Stor opbakning af frivillige
Jan christoffersen (2 years ago)
Super hyggeligt en skam kælleren ikke var åben
Noah Mickelun (2 years ago)
Great! Especially the Restaurant, price is on the steep side of life, however it is definitely worth the cost.
Peder Hansen (3 years ago)
Nice old castle. Despite being a small place it offers great impressions. ... both the vegetable gardens and the surrounding gardens are really nice. If you have got the time you should treat yourself with a dinner in the basements of the castle, greeeat food and service!
Chris Brown (3 years ago)
Fantastic Food Fantastic location
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