Sønderskov Manor

Brorup, Denmark

Sønderskov Manor is mentioned for the first time in 1448. After 1536 the owner built a new main wing with two diagonally placed defensive towers because the nobility feared new peasants’ revolts like those they had experienced during the Count’s Feud.

About 1614 Sønderskov was destroyed by fire but the owner, Thomas Juel, rebuilt it, and the new manor was finished in 1620. He was a wealthy man who owned three manor houses, and he served King Christian IV in various functions. Part of his prosperity was due to the fattening of bullocks for export.

In 1720 Hans Bachmann became the first non-noble squire at Sønderskov. He and his successor Samuel Nicolaus Claudius transformed Sønderskov into the Baroque manor house, which can still be seen today. During a thorough restoration in the years 1986-1992 several unique wall-paintings and a decorated wooden ceiling from the second half of the 17th century were discovered.

Today Sønderskov is housing the regional museum and the Baroque garden and parts of the kitchen- and herb gardens have been recreated.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1614-1620
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Denmark
Historical period: Early Modern Denmark (Denmark)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Michelle McDonald (6 months ago)
Beautiful museum from 1620 with history dating back to the Middle Ages. They have have changing exhibitions, currently one about being Danish that focuses on what it was like when south Jutland was lost to Prussia and the Danish people where forced to hide there nationality and to speak German. Lovely kitchen garden and 2,7km marked trail. Children can rent a metal detector and find items in a designated area for 40kr/30min and they get a diploma after.
Tracey Coogan (8 months ago)
Excellent museum exhibition and access to many rooms. Lots of restoration and archaeological studies have unearthed unearthed some treasures. Well worth the visit. Friendly and helpful staff. Free at the moment but only 30kr usually.
Betty Poulsen (3 years ago)
Smukt restaureret .Stor opbakning af frivillige
Jan christoffersen (3 years ago)
Super hyggeligt en skam kælleren ikke var åben
Noah Mickelun (3 years ago)
Great! Especially the Restaurant, price is on the steep side of life, however it is definitely worth the cost.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Mosque–Cathedral of Córdoba

The Mosque–Cathedral of Córdoba, also known as the Great Mosque of Córdoba and the Mezquita is regarded as one of the most accomplished monuments of Moorish architecture.

According to a traditional account, a small Visigoth church, the Catholic Basilica of Saint Vincent of Lérins, originally stood on the site. In 784 Abd al-Rahman I ordered construction of the Great Mosque, which was considerably expanded by later Muslim rulers. The mosque underwent numerous subsequent changes: Abd al-Rahman II ordered a new minaret, while in 961 Al-Hakam II enlarged the building and enriched the Mihrab. The last of such reforms was carried out by Almanzor in 987. It was connected to the Caliph"s palace by a raised walkway, mosques within the palaces being the tradition for previous Islamic rulers – as well as Christian Kings who built their palaces adjacent to churches. The Mezquita reached its current dimensions in 987 with the completion of the outer naves and courtyard.

In 1236, Córdoba was conquered by King Ferdinand III of Castile, and the centre of the mosque was converted into a Catholic cathedral. Alfonso X oversaw the construction of the Villaviciosa Chapel and the Royal Chapel within the mosque. The kings who followed added further Christian features, such as King Henry II rebuilding the chapel in the 14th century. The minaret of the mosque was also converted to the bell tower of the cathedral. It was adorned with Santiago de Compostela"s captured cathedral bells. Following a windstorm in 1589, the former minaret was further reinforced by encasing it within a new structure.

The most significant alteration was the building of a Renaissance cathedral nave in the middle of the expansive structure. The insertion was constructed by permission of Charles V, king of Castile and Aragon. Artisans and architects continued to add to the existing structure until the late 18th century.

Architecture

The building"s floor plan is seen to be parallel to some of the earliest mosques built from the very beginning of Islam. It had a rectangular prayer hall with aisles arranged perpendicular to the qibla, the direction towards which Muslims pray. The prayer hall was large and flat, with timber ceilings held up by arches of horseshoe-like appearance.

In planning the mosque, the architects incorporated a number of Roman columns with choice capitals. Some of the columns were already in the Gothic structure; others were sent from various regions of Iberia as presents from the governors of provinces. Ivory, jasper, porphyry, gold, silver, copper, and brass were used in the decorations. Marvellous mosaics and azulejos were designed. Later, the immense temple embodied all the styles of Morisco architecture into one composition.

The building is most notable for its arcaded hypostyle hall, with 856 columns of jasper, onyx, marble, granite and porphyry. These were made from pieces of the Roman temple that had occupied the site previously, as well as other Roman buildings, such as the Mérida amphitheatre. The double arches were an innovation, permitting higher ceilings than would otherwise be possible with relatively low columns. The double arches consist of a lower horseshoe arch and an upper semi-circular arch.