Sønderskov Manor

Brorup, Denmark

Sønderskov Manor is mentioned for the first time in 1448. After 1536 the owner built a new main wing with two diagonally placed defensive towers because the nobility feared new peasants’ revolts like those they had experienced during the Count’s Feud.

About 1614 Sønderskov was destroyed by fire but the owner, Thomas Juel, rebuilt it, and the new manor was finished in 1620. He was a wealthy man who owned three manor houses, and he served King Christian IV in various functions. Part of his prosperity was due to the fattening of bullocks for export.

In 1720 Hans Bachmann became the first non-noble squire at Sønderskov. He and his successor Samuel Nicolaus Claudius transformed Sønderskov into the Baroque manor house, which can still be seen today. During a thorough restoration in the years 1986-1992 several unique wall-paintings and a decorated wooden ceiling from the second half of the 17th century were discovered.

Today Sønderskov is housing the regional museum and the Baroque garden and parts of the kitchen- and herb gardens have been recreated.

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Details

Founded: 1614-1620
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Denmark
Historical period: Early Modern Denmark (Denmark)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Michelle McDonald (9 months ago)
Beautiful museum from 1620 with history dating back to the Middle Ages. They have have changing exhibitions, currently one about being Danish that focuses on what it was like when south Jutland was lost to Prussia and the Danish people where forced to hide there nationality and to speak German. Lovely kitchen garden and 2,7km marked trail. Children can rent a metal detector and find items in a designated area for 40kr/30min and they get a diploma after.
Tracey Coogan (11 months ago)
Excellent museum exhibition and access to many rooms. Lots of restoration and archaeological studies have unearthed unearthed some treasures. Well worth the visit. Friendly and helpful staff. Free at the moment but only 30kr usually.
Betty Poulsen (3 years ago)
Smukt restaureret .Stor opbakning af frivillige
Jan christoffersen (3 years ago)
Super hyggeligt en skam kælleren ikke var åben
Noah Mickelun (3 years ago)
Great! Especially the Restaurant, price is on the steep side of life, however it is definitely worth the cost.
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