Engelsholm Castle

Bredsten, Denmark

Engelsholm Castle, overlooking Engelsholm Lake was originally a manor house from to the 15th century. Little is known about Engelsholm's earliest history. The estate was acquired from the crown by Timme Nielsen Rosenkrantz in 1452. It was owned by the Brahe family between 1590 and 1725. Knud Brahe, the brother of famous astronomer Tycho Brahe, constructed a new main building, in two storeys and with four corner towers, in 1592-93. The identity of the architect remains unclear but it may have been Hans van Steenwinckel the Elder or Hercules von Oberberg.

This Renaissance castle was adapted to the Baroque style for Gerhard de Lichtenberg with the assistance of Nicolaus Hinrich Rieman. By 1740 it was a white-washed building with a black-glazed tile roof and onion domes topping the four towers.

Engelsholm's most famous former owner is Admiral Niels Juel who owned the estate from 1784 until 1786. Most of the land was sold off in lots in 1931 and the adjacent farm buildings were demolished.

Engelsholm was purchased and turned into a folk high school in 1939, from 1952 run as a self-owning institution. Housing for students and faculty has later been built next to the castle to a design by Jens Malling Pedersen (b. 1920). The school specializes in artistic courses, combomg both music and visual arts.

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Details

Founded: c. 1592
Category: Castles and fortifications in Denmark
Historical period: Early Modern Denmark (Denmark)

Rating

3.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Helle Rau Hartmann (3 years ago)
Fantastisk smukt.
Thomas Agsten (3 years ago)
Sehr schönes Schloss
Rasmus Gøtzsche Jensen (4 years ago)
Super højskole
Philip Theodor Frederiksen (4 years ago)
Flot sted. Gode anmeldelser
Moaiad alkawa (6 years ago)
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