Næsseslottet Manor

Holte, Denmark

Næsseslottet is an 18th-century country house and previously a royal farm known as Dronningegård. Dronninggård was built in 1661 to manage the Crown's extensive holdings of farm land in the area. The farm belonged to the powerful Queen Sophie Amalie until her death in 1714, hence the name which translates as Queen's House. After that, the property was sold and changed hands several times but eventually it fell into a state of despair.

The main building stood as a ruin when the estate was acquired by Frédéric de Coninck in 1881. Originally from the Netherlands, he had emigrated to Denmark in 1763 where he had set up a shipping company and made a fortune in foreign trade. He commissioned court architect Andreas Kirkerup to build a new house while the old building was rebuilt and converted into a farm.

Frédéric de Coninck was very fond of the estate and its surroundings. When he acquired the Danneskiold-Laurvig Mansion in Copenhagen (now known as Moltke's Mansion after a later owner) in 1788, to serve as his new residence during the winter season, he commissioned the painter Erik Pauelsen to create two large paintings and three overdoors with motifs of his Dronninggård estate.

After de Coninck's death at Næsseslottet in 1811. both the shipping empire and the Dronninggård estate was passed on to his son but the times were changing. Denmark was experiencing hard times after the state bankruptcy in 1813 and after de Coninck's company went bankrupt in 1821, Dronninggård had to be sold. The following owners generally preferred to reside at Frederikslund while Næsseslottet fell into neglect. In 1898, it was acquired by a consortium and turned into a bathing hotel while most of the land was sold off in lots. However, the venue was no great succes and in 1906 the property was sold to August Bagge, a book publisher.

Later in the century the estate was acquired by Copenhagen Municipality and turned into a medical facility. In 1984 the Danish Red Cross used the building as their first refugee centre in Denmark. In 1986 it once again passed into private ownership and has now been turned into an office hotel.

The manor park has a number of monuments and decorative features. The sculptor Carl Frederik Stanley created several monument for the park, including one to trade and shipping. Johannes Wiedewelt has contributed with an obelisk and ornamental vases. The two pavilions and the stables were designed by Axel Berg and are from about 1900.

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User Reviews

Sihang Liu (2 months ago)
If you meet the castle and its surrounding grasslands in sunny days, you will definitely fall in love with this estate.
Pia Friis (3 months ago)
Beautiful place
Niels Plannthin (4 months ago)
The coolest place just outside Copenhagen
Bent Andersen (13 months ago)
A really beautiful place all over with lots of old trees and good patches you can walk in the forest up to the castle !
Maja Jacobsen (17 months ago)
Beautiful walk through the park and along the lake... Næsseslottet manor (peninsula castle) is located on a peninsula in Lake Furesø, in the center of a former hunting star, which was the waiting place for the par force hunt. The estate had previously been a royal farm called Dronninggård, built in 1661. The main building was destroyed, when the estate was acquired by the succesful dutch merchant Frédéric de Coninck (1740-1811), who became one of Denmark's largest shipping owners. He built his summer residence in Louis XVI style in 1782-83. The manor garden was designed by de Coninck's old friend, the flemish landscape architect J.F. Henry de Drevon (1734-1797) and is one of Denmark's first romantic landscape gardens. Today it is a public park and the building is an office Hotel.
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