Skrøbelev Gods (Skrøbelev Manor) is a traditional Danish estate dating back to 1669. The name has been changed from 'Skrøbelevgaard' to the current name in 2007. It is located on the island of Langeland in the south of Denmark. The Manor House has recently been renovated and is now being used as a venue for weddings and other celebrations. The estate features a large courtyard, surrounded by the main building, green meadows with its display of strutting peacocks, cascading fountain, moat and the bridge which leads you to the church. The Estate has 6 horse stables and the area is a relatively popular destination for eco-tourism and fishing as the island is a thin strip of land, surrounded by the sea on both sides.

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Details

Founded: 1669
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Denmark
Historical period: Absolutism (Denmark)

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Erik Clausen (2 years ago)
Super menneskevarmt og venligt. Rigtig god, vedkommende og engageret modtagelse med rundvisning og gode værelser. Menuen var velkomponeret, meget vesmagende og elegant. Hyggeligt i den store "riddersal ". Med spøgelseshistorier efter kaffen. Personalet engageret og professionelt. Skrøbeløv Gods får gæsterne til at føle sig hjemme og velkomne. BRAVO. Et virkeligt godt sted at besøge.
kristina hansen (2 years ago)
Lille hyggelig gods dejlige værelser og skøn skøn mad helt igennem fantastisk oplevelse.. mit men ligger på vi har fået et ophold og da vi kun kan i weekenden så der meget opholdet der falder fra.. hvis ikke vi havde råd til at købe selv så var det sku en skrabet oplevelse...
Polina Aine (2 years ago)
There is a beautiful area outside the building with a fountain. It gives a beautiful sight. The building inside is modern but is made in authentic old Victorian style. The building itself is plain , but the outside space and the decoration inside makes up for it. Good service generally quite luxurious feeling. The food is tasty and there are possibilities for some flexibility.
Bjørn Vestergaard Høj (3 years ago)
Excellent food and service. Though a little pricy and the rooms could need a minor upgrade. The location is perfect near Rudkobing assuming you have a car.
Thomas Holmberg (4 years ago)
Very romantic place. The food was decent, and the rooms are very nice. A bit too pricy overall unfortunately
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