Towards the end of his reign, King Frederik IV of Denmark wished for the same degree of comfort in provincial castles as he enjoyed in Copenhagen. In 1720 a contract was signed for alterations to be made to Odensegård manor. The gardener of Rosenborg Palace, J.C.Krieger, was entrusted with the work. From his studies in England and the Netherlands, he had learnt about the Dutch Baroque style.A new main wing was added to the three former wings. The upper floor housed the king's apartment to the west and the queen's to the east. Between them lay the shared dining room with adjoining audience chambers.

The rooms were organised in the same way for the crown prince's family on the ground floor. The central room on this floor was intended for the lords and ladies in waiting at the court. The new wing was built af salvaged materials from Nyborg Castle, which had been seriously damaged during the war against the Swedish.Krieger also laid our a beautiful castle garden in the classic, French style. The entire complex was completed in 1730. Despite illness, the king expressed a wish to see it. He came, saw his work - and died one early October morning, sitting in a chair in the new sleeping chambers.Today the Odense City Council uses in the castle and you can only see it from the outside.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 1721
Category: Castles and fortifications in Denmark
Historical period: Absolutism (Denmark)

More Information

www.visitodense.com

Rating

3.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sylvester Makaka (18 months ago)
Great reception
Jonas Helweg-Mikkelsen (2 years ago)
Beautiful place and definitely worth a visit when the touches are on in the garden.
Freja Faaborg (2 years ago)
Quidditch
Vicky Victoria (2 years ago)
Nice big park.
Oskar Bak (2 years ago)
The castle can only be admired from outside as it is closed to the public.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Externsteine Stones

The Externsteine (Extern stones) is a distinctive sandstone rock formation located in the Teutoburg Forest, near the town of Horn-Bad Meinberg. The formation is a tor consisting of several tall, narrow columns of rock which rise abruptly from the surrounding wooded hills. Archaeological excavations have yielded some Upper Paleolithic stone tools dating to about 10,700 BC from 9,600 BC.

In a popular tradition going back to an idea proposed to Hermann Hamelmann in 1564, the Externsteine are identified as a sacred site of the pagan Saxons, and the location of the Irminsul (sacral pillar-like object in German paganism) idol reportedly destroyed by Charlemagne; there is however no archaeological evidence that would confirm the site's use during the relevant period.

The stones were used as the site of a hermitage in the Middle Ages, and by at least the high medieval period were the site of a Christian chapel. The Externsteine relief is a medieval depiction of the Descent from the Cross. It remains controversial whether the site was already used for Christian worship in the 8th to early 10th centuries.

The Externsteine gained prominence when Völkisch and nationalistic scholars took an interest in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This interest peaked under the Nazi regime, when the Externsteine became a focus of nazi propaganda. Today, they remain a popular tourist destination and also continue to attract Neo-Pagans and Neo-Nazis.