Towards the end of his reign, King Frederik IV of Denmark wished for the same degree of comfort in provincial castles as he enjoyed in Copenhagen. In 1720 a contract was signed for alterations to be made to Odensegård manor. The gardener of Rosenborg Palace, J.C.Krieger, was entrusted with the work. From his studies in England and the Netherlands, he had learnt about the Dutch Baroque style.A new main wing was added to the three former wings. The upper floor housed the king's apartment to the west and the queen's to the east. Between them lay the shared dining room with adjoining audience chambers.

The rooms were organised in the same way for the crown prince's family on the ground floor. The central room on this floor was intended for the lords and ladies in waiting at the court. The new wing was built af salvaged materials from Nyborg Castle, which had been seriously damaged during the war against the Swedish.Krieger also laid our a beautiful castle garden in the classic, French style. The entire complex was completed in 1730. Despite illness, the king expressed a wish to see it. He came, saw his work - and died one early October morning, sitting in a chair in the new sleeping chambers.Today the Odense City Council uses in the castle and you can only see it from the outside.

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Details

Founded: 1721
Category: Castles and fortifications in Denmark
Historical period: Absolutism (Denmark)

More Information

www.visitodense.com

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mhd Sukar (12 months ago)
Very good
Piotr Brzezinski (2 years ago)
A place worthy. I recommend
dudi baum (2 years ago)
Not interesting
the winan (2 years ago)
Lots of grass, nice place to eat your lunch and a location where the events held there aren't limited. Not THAT special again compared to other outdoor grass areas if it is just on a regular day, unlesd you make it to.
Patrick Munk (2 years ago)
Mostly administrative buildings. Not much to look at.
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