St. Alban's Church

Odense, Denmark

St. Alban's Roman Catholic Church in Odense should not be confused with the medieval church of St. Alban's Priory where King Canute IV was murdered in 1086, and which was later replaced with St. Canute's Cathedral. Odense's first Catholic congregation since the Protestant reformation was established in 1867, and consisted of 12 adults and 7 children. In the first few years services were hold in rented space, but in 1869 the congregation purchased part of Odense Priory and established St. Mary's church, an all-girls school, and residence for the Sisters of St. Joseph. An additional building was constructed, which housed an all-boys school and homes for the priests.

In 1899 the first Redemptorists arrived from Austria and started collecting funds for the building of a permanent church, receiving considerable contributions from Austria and Germany. The foundation for the new church was placed on October 21, 1906, and on October 25, 1908, the unfinished building was consecrated and dedicated to Our Lady, Saint Alban, and Saint Canute.

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Address

Adelgade 1, Odense, Denmark
See all sites in Odense

Details

Founded: 1906-1908
Category: Religious sites in Denmark

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Pavol Ondruška (20 months ago)
The only catholic church in Odense. Apart from regular masses in Danish, they offer Sunday masses also in Vietnamese and Polish. Once a month, there is also a holy mass in English.
Patrik Vildtorne (2 years ago)
Old nice catholic church, which invites you to peace and quiet.
Tao Sicka (2 years ago)
I was there for the Polish Easter service, and the way the priest was talking to people was horrible, he was basically screaming at us, and even talking badly about Denmark and Danish culture.. I do not agree that people in Denmark thinks that it is more important to be beautiful on the "outside", and then the inside not ''good'' . If the priest do not like beeing in DK then why is he here? No wonder why there is not so many people in the church on a Sunday service... It looks like the prist is quite negative person, not warm, screaming at people. Why should we come to church service to his bad talk??
Wanchalerm Krittakanee (3 years ago)
The one church which you can see from long distance.
張小銓 (4 years ago)
I like this tallest building in this small town
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