Gamleborg Viking Fortress

Bornholm, Denmark

Gamleborg, also known as Gamleborg Viking Fortress, was the first fortress on the Danish island of Bornholm. Built around 750 AD, it was the seat of the kings of Bornholm during the Viking age (750–1050) and early Middle Ages (1050–1150). The massive fortress is 264 metres long from north to south and 110 metres wide from east to west, with gates to the north and southwest. Around 1100, significant alterations were made and it was reinforced, but it was abandoned soon afterwards in favour of Lilleborg Castle, roughly 700 metres to the northeast.

The fortress is Bornholm's oldest defence works. Its builder is unknown, but an account of the Baltic Sea travels of Wulfstan of Hedebyin 890 tells us that Bornholm already had its own king at the time. There is, however, firm evidence that the fortress was in use during the reigns of Harald Bluetooth (940–986) and Canute IV (1080–1086). The Gamleborg fort was used as refuge during the tenth century against Viking raids. Gamleborg was abandoned in 1150, the occupants moving to Lilleborg, only 700 metres to the northwest. It is not known why the move was made but it does not appear to have been the result of hostilities. Excavations in the 1950s showed the fortifications originated in the Viking period although there is evidence the site was used as a hideout in the Iron Age. The ruins that can be seen today are mainly the result of reconstruction work completed in about 1100.

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Details

Founded: 750 AD
Category: Ruins in Denmark
Historical period: Germanic Iron Age (Denmark)

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4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Simon Hansen (6 months ago)
Mit første besøg på Gammelborg, var jeg 10 måske 11 år, da min klassekammerat boede i området. Den voldgrav måtte ha ha rester af krokodiller, da min ADHD Fantasi, havde lært mig "en voldgrav er ikke en voldgrav uden "krokodiller", fandt ingen rester?. I dag ved jeg de havde ildspydende drager istedet, wow? Må indrømme jeg kommer der ikke mere, efter sidste besøg, fandt jeg 9 tæger, da jeg kom hjem.
Ole Andersen (2 years ago)
After living on Bornholm for over 50 years, I finally visited Gammelborg. Worth a visit for those interested in ancient culture.
Renato Ribeiro (2 years ago)
Nothing much to see, but nice if you have time to spend.
Michaela May (3 years ago)
Be careful and watch your step in places. Would love to see some of the vegetation removed to help maintain the structure. A good way to visit nature and history. Not very handicap accessible, as to be expected with the type of site it is.
Nils Kristensen (4 years ago)
Svært at komme til. Men besøget værd
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