St. Morten’s Church

Randers, Denmark

St. Morten's church is the only of the five Middle Age churches in Randers that remain today. It was built around 1494-1520 as a replacement for the earlier Middle Age church by the same name. It is dedicated to St. Martin of Tours. The church was handed over to Helligåndsbrødrenes Kloster (the Monastery of the Brothers of the Holy Spirit) whose abbot Jens Mathiasen was builder of the existing church. It made up a wing of Helligåndklostret (the Monestary of the Holy Spirit) of which the neighbouring Helligåndshus (House of the Holy Spirit) is also a remnant.

The church is built of medieval large bricks in late Gothic style. Ever since 1534, the church has been a parish church. However, the tower with its characteristic onion steeple was not built until 1795-97. Around the church was the cemetary which was abolished in 1812 and ever since, it has been a market place.

The façade is a beautiful Baroque work from 1751. In 2004 Per Kirkeby's modern alter tableau illustrating Good Friday in Gethsemane Garden was unveiled.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1494-1520
Category: Religious sites in Denmark
Historical period: Kalmar Union (Denmark)

More Information

www.visitdenmark.com

User Reviews

Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Church of St Donatus

The Church of St Donatus name refers to Donatus of Zadar, who began construction on this church in the 9th century and ended it on the northeastern part of the Roman forum. It is the largest Pre-Romanesque building in Croatia.

The beginning of the building of the church was placed to the second half of the 8th century, and it is supposed to have been completed in the 9th century. The Zadar bishop and diplomat Donat (8th and 9th centuries) is credited with the building of the church. He led the representations of the Dalmatian cities to Constantinople and Charles the Great, which is why this church bears slight resemblance to Charlemagne"s court chapels, especially the one in Aachen, and also to the Basilica of San Vitale in Ravenna. It belongs to the Pre-Romanesque architectural period.

The circular church, formerly domed, is 27 m high and is characterised by simplicity and technical primitivism.